Mrs Hatton

St Catherine’s Hospice – Runner’s Blog

Jenny Hatton is just one of 21 runners taking part in Run Reigate in aid of St Catherine’s Hospice. Here she shares why she’s taking on the challenge this September:

“My mum, Mary, was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in December 2014. She’d beaten bowel cancer several years previously and sailed through her treatment, she even drove herself to and from her radiotherapy appointments in Guildford. When Mum was diagnosed and told that the cancer was incurable, she took the decision not to have treatment. She’d been offered palliative chemotherapy on a Wednesday but that was the day she met up with her friends for lunch every week and she viewed that as a much better form of ‘treatment’. Mum chose quality of life over quantity, a decision I fully respected and supported and although she fought bravely and stoically, she passed away in November 2015.

The team at St Catherine’s supported us during Mum’s final months. Mum didn’t want to go into the hospice for respite care “in case I don’t come out” but after several very tough days at home she went into the hospice for 10 days and then didn’t want to leave. She stayed there for three weeks. The staff were so caring and kind, nothing was too much trouble; they laughed with us and cried with us, supported us and just held our hands at a very difficult time. They were there at any time of day or night, which was so reassuring.

Mrs Hatton

When Mum went into St Catherine’s, she had completely lost her appetite and had eaten very little for days but I remember her being given a bowl of chocolate sponge and sauce on arrival and she ate the lot. She visibly relaxed and you could sense her relief at being there. St Catherine’s is an incredible place, the drinks trolley goes round at 5pm, a neighbouring cat comes in and takes up residence on patients’ beds and anything that can be done is done to make everyone feel at ease – Mum was a big horse racing fan and they arranged for a copy of the Racing Post to be delivered to her every day. 

We had arranged a party for Mum six weeks before she passed away. A gathering of more than 60 of her friends, neighbours and colleagues, many travelling from far and wide to be there. Mum had been in St Catherine’s for 10 days prior to the party and without their support the party would not have taken place. One of the nurses at St Catherine’s helped Mum get ready for the party and she was well enough to attend and enjoy the day. It was wonderful and I have many photos and happy memories as does everyone who was there.

I took part in the first Run Reigate Half Marathon in 2014 which went past Mum’s front door. She came out to watch and although the route has been changed, it feels right that I should take part in the race on 18 September in her memory. St Catherine’s works with people and they were there for me and Mum when it mattered. I do not know what we would have done without them.”

To find out more about how you can support St Catherine’s please visit or to support Jenny with her fundraising please visit:



Parkview – Runner’s Knee

Check out the new blog from Parkview, Run Reigate’s on the day physiotherapists, all about Runner’s Knee, a problem that some runners may suffer from.  

If you do need some new trainers, Simply Sports in Reigate have professional fitters and on Thursday 8th September (10.00-15.30), Brooks will be there with their Experience Run Signature equipment to analyse your gait.

Runner’s Knee

Runner’s knee is probably the most common injury suffered by recreational runners. It is also known as Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome as the pain comes on due to issues around the knee-cap (Patella).

Unfortunately, those most likely to suffer are young women due to a wider pelvis that in turn creates a greater angle at the knee during running, however, it is still very common in male runners too.

Runner’s knee will usually present as a dull ache around or behind the knee-cap, sometimes with swelling or cracking noises. Running through the pain will not help and only make it worse, as will hills, uneven ground or steps.

There are number of identified causes of this syndrome, the most common include:

  • Deformities to the Patella
  • Worn Cartilage surfaces
  • Flat feet creating incorrect angles of the knee
  • Weak medial Quadriceps allowing mal-tracking of the Patella
  • Simple overuse or poor shock absorbency

Getting rid of Runner’s Knee whilst maintaining a training program can be tricky, but not impossible. If you feel this coming on it is important to do the right things straight away. Cutting back your mileage will allow less load on the knee and speed up healing. Using ice regularly to get rid of any inflammation is vital. However, you must address the cause. This might mean a visit to a Physiotherapist and a specialist running shop to get your biomechanics assessed.

A sports orientated Physio can give you the advice and treatment you need to calm down the pain and begin the rehab process. Treatment can include Kinesio Taping for Patella tracking and swelling, Ultrasound, Acupuncture, Massage and rehab exercises to correct the problem. Orthotics and corrective running shoes may also be advised as part of the solution.

Remember, early intervention leads to the best outcomes, so if you think you might be suffering then please give one of the team at Parkview Clinic Reigate a call to see what can be done to get you back on track as fast as possible.

01737 247555


Every breath you take, every muscle that aches…or maybe not

Catherine Jaschinski from Illuminate Consulting, is a Yoga and Mindfulness Teacher.  Her blog for Run Reigate examines the benefits of diaphragm breathing for runners.


Sorry if the headline of this article is a bad play on the Police song ‘Every breath you take’ but hopefully my verbal karaoke has got your attention.

About the only time we pay any attention to our breathing is when we are out of breath.  In running it’s usually on the home stretch of a long run and if we are unlucky it’s going up a hill as well. Does anyone remember that from last year’s Run Reigate Half-Marathon?

Our breathing is such a critical part of anything we do and yet we take it for granted.  In running it can play a number of important roles, one of them being a ‘barometer’ for how we are feeling during a run.  Sometimes when we run, our breathing is heavy, sluggish and a real struggle to draw into the body, other times it’s is light, smooth and up-lifting.  Paying attention to the nature of our breathing can guide us to how our body is handling this run and with this information we can decide how to ‘pace’ our run, i.e. whether to push through the tough patches or whether in this particular instance it may be better to ease up a bit.  Your breath can be a great tool to help inform this type of decision especially if you are the kind of person who tends to push your body to breaking point and get injuries.

Another great way you can use your breath is to improve your endurance and recovery.  Yes, that’s right.  Not only is the breath helping you to get up and down those hills, but also if you actively breathe using your diaphragm rather than your chest, you can improve your endurance and will be less likely to become fatigued.  Now wouldn’t that be nice – not to have such aches and pains after a long run.

The evidence for this comes from research from the Centre for Sports Medicine and Human Performance at Brunei University.  They measured fatigue levels of marathoner’s respiratory muscles and leg muscles and found a direct link between them – runners whose breathing was the most strained showed the most leg weakness.  They concluded that the harder the respiratory muscles had to work, the more the legs would struggle in a race.  So the key to preventing lung and leg fatigue is breathing more fully which is exactly what happens when you breathe using the diaphragm.

This is all very interesting but how on earth do I actively use my diaphragm to breathe when I don’t know where it is!  Your diaphragm is a big muscle that sits underneath your rib cage and is responsible for 80% of the effort involved in breathing.  If your tuck your fingers under your ribcage and gently push upward you will feel it there.

The easiest way to learn how to diaphragm or ‘belly breathe’ is to do the following….

  1. Lie on your back with your feet on the floor and knees bent
  2. As you breathe in allow / encourage your stomach to gently inflate and rise upwards (this movement gets your diaphragm working)
  3. As you exhale allow your stomach to deflate and lower downwards
  4. Practice this for 5-10 minutes and then you can try it standing for a few minutes

Once you’ve started to train the diaphragm breathing in a stationary position (lying or standing) you can try to use it while walking and then eventually bring it into your running.

This type of breathing is also very good to relax the body and mind so can be used outside of running to manage stress, build resilience and balance in other aspects of your life.

Just as we would train our hamstrings and quads to improve our leg strength we can improve our respiratory muscles for better breathing and ultimately better endurance.  

So when you next head out for a run, take a moment to notice your breath, use your diaphragm (at the start of the run at least) and thank it for helping you to enjoy those longer runs a little bit more.

Catherine Jaschinski

Yoga and Mindfulness Teacher

Illuminate Consulting Ltd

Mobile: 07801 045 905

Illuminate Colour on Clear copy

The next Yoga for Runners workshop will be on Wednesday 5th October 7.30 – 9.30pm in Reigate. Call Cath on mobile number 07801 045 905 or email if interested.

Running man illustration

Advice on Shin Splints from Parkview Clinic

Run Reigate are delighted that Parkview Clinic in Reigate are joining us at this year’s event.  Check out their blog on Shin Splints and how their clinic can help if you’re suffering…


Shin Splints, also known as Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome is a condition commonly suffered by long distance runners and affects the front of the lower leg. It will often begin as a dull ache along the shin bone, but can build up to be quite an acute pain that will stop you exercising.

There are a number of reasons Shin Splints can happen, however, you are most at risk due to the following factors:

  • You’ve recently taken up running or increased your distance
  • You run on hard surfaces
  • You’re carrying too much weight
  • Poor fitting running shoes
  • Your feet roll inwards
  • The muscles of your lower leg are too tight

The pain is caused by inflammation to the connective tissue that joins your muscles to the bone. If you feel these symptoms it is vital that you do not run through the pain as this will only make it worse and keep you of sport for a longer time. A minimum of 2 weeks rest, ice and anti-inflammatory work is advised. However, if you have not addressed the reason it has come on then it may repeat once you start running again.

A quick accurate diagnosis is important to confirm that it is Shin Splints and not other conditions such as Compartment Syndrome, Radiculopathy, Stress Fractures or Muscle tear.

An early visit to a physiotherapist is the best solution  to confirm this and assess the reasons behind the pain. Physios will look at the angles of your feet, the integrity of the foot arch, the bio-mechanical chains between your feet, knees and hips and examine your stride pattern during running.

As mentioned, rest is vital, but calming down the inflammation and muscle tension can be sped up by using treatment techniques such as Ultrasound, Acupuncture, Facia release, Massage and exercise rehab. You may also be advised on changing footwear or using Orthotics and importantly making sure your running technique is correct.

Often through a desire for speed and exhaustion runners will over-reach in their stride pattern creating a more acute impact angle when the foot hits the ground, usually with the knee locked out in extension, thus reducing shock absorbance. This exaggerated impact that sends a force through the shin bone is a common reason for Shin Splints to begin. Don’t worry though, changing your running pattern doesn’t mean slower times as your “Cadence” or strides per minute can easily be maintained!

If you are concerned about such pain and it is affecting your training routine for the forthcoming Run Reigate event then please do give the team at Parkview Clinic Reigate a call and come down for an expert assessment. You’ll be pleased to know they are currently offering all entrants 10% off treatments up to the 18th September!

Visit: 01737 247555


Sweethaven Computers

5 Ways Wearable Tech Can Enhance Your Workout

Run Reigate is delighted that Sweethaven have joined us as a new partner this year.  Check out their blog on wearable tech – including your chance to win a FREE Pulsense wristband.

Sweethaven Computers (1)

Technology is fast becoming an integral part of people’s fitness plans. Wearable fitness tech is constantly advancing to improve the quality of our training and results, enabling us to better create and meet both short-term and long-term fitness goals.

With so many features now available via wearable tech, which are the most useful for enhancing your workout? The technology team at Sweethaven has a few top tips…

Track Your Heart Rate

Of course your heart rate is going to go up during exercise! What many people don’t know is that heart rate can also be used to monitor dehydration; the symptoms of which are often overlooked by athletes during exercise. The wireless sensor tracking of heart rate can therefore be used to help you track when you need to be taking that extra sip of water.

Sleep Tracking

Tough workouts require solid sleep for muscle recovery! Use your wearable tech to track the number of hours and quality of sleep you’re getting to help make sure you’re giving your body the best opportunity for regeneration.

Target Tracker

All athletes know that progress is about goals. Use your wearable tech to set your targets and then track your progress towards achievement for positive reinforcement. Determine your daily goal and then see what your average result against it is. You can adjust your daily targets accordingly, just be sure that your goal positively impacts your fitness level – and that, over time, you see progress.

For the more competitive ones amongst us, buddy up with a training partner with similar goals to track who reaches their goal the quickest!

Calorie Counting

Because what’s more motivational than visibly eating away at the calories gained from that last pack of biscuits!

Discover all the Apps

With a whole world of apps now available, there will be a host of apps capable of accompanying and complimenting your wearable tech tracking. Apps for monitoring food intake, for example, can be a particularly beneficial when used alongside your fitness tracking to ensure you’re fuelling your body correctly. There are also apps out there that allow you to connect with online communities of fellow fitness enthusiasts for even more support and encouragement.

Sweethaven is proud to be supporting the Run Reigate half marathon this September. To celebrate this important calendar date, we’ll be giving away one FREE Pulsense wristband to one lucky runner. To be in with a chance of winning, enter your details via our website:

Sweethaven Computers


Dame Kelly Holmes at Run Reigate

Last week’s blog was all about inspiration.  As our thoughts turn to the Olympics,  there are few more inspirational runners than Dame Kelly Holmes…

Dame Kelly Holmes is a legend in many ways.  Winner of gold in the 800m and 1500m distances at the 2004 Athens Olympics and she is still the holder of the 600m, 800m and 1,000m British records.  She has been an inspiration for thousands of young people to take up middle distance running.  Dame Kelly also spent 6 years as the President of the English Commonwealth Games.  She is a great supporter of charitable work and has set up her own, the Dame Kelly Holmes Trust – more about this later.

Helping to Make Run Reigate Even More Special

It will be amazing to have Dame Kelly with us on the big day and we’ll be keeping her really busy!  Ranging from starting our races, awarding prizes to the winners and handing medals out to some of the kids in their events.  If at any point you see her jogging between roles, please do not take this as an opportunity to race her.  It will be embarrassing for everyone concerned, especially when she beats you…

Dame Kelly Holmes

Your Chance to Meet Dame Kelly Holmes

Yes, you can have the chance to meet her in person!  Dame Kelly Holmes will be hosting an exclusive Race Reception with 30 winners.  The raffle is open to all registered runners, you just have to buy a £3 ticket to be entered into the draw.

The “VIP Race Reception”:

  • Only open to the 30 winners of the raffle
  • You will hear exclusive background and tips from this Olympic legend
  • Be hosted in a VIP tented marquee
  • Ask questions and get photos with a national running hero
  • Get your Run Reigate exclusive finishers t-shirt signed
  • Drinks and light refreshments also provided

Tickets are £3 each or 4 for £10

To sign up for the raffle you must be registered for this year’s event, then enter at   If you haven’t signed up yet, you can buy tickets when you book your place online.  Entries close 11.59pm on Sunday 4th September and winners will be notified within 24 hours.  You can enter as many times as you like (no one will judge you for stalking).

Kelly’s Heroes

All proceeds, and we’re hoping to raise a great deal of raffle prize money, will be given directly to Dame Kelly’s charities, for whom she is hoping to raise a staggering £250,000 this year.  These are all organisations that are close to her heart which she calls Kelly’s heroes because of the time and care they give to people in need.  For more information about each of the charities, including her own Trust, which supports disadvantaged young people, please click on the links below:

The Dame Kelly Holmes Trust

Mind UK


Hospice in the Weald

Pickering Cancer Care Charity

Run Reigate are delighted to be able to support all of these community charities and would greatly appreciate it if you could dig deep in your pockets to support them too.  However if you’re not one of the lucky winners, don’t worry, you’ll have plenty of opportunity to see her around and about at the event.

We’re more excited than ever about the big day now and we hope you are too!  If you haven’t entered either the 10K or half-marathon don’t worry, there’s still time to sign-up and join in the fun.  2016 is going to be Run Reigate’s best event yet!


Jennie Platt Blog

On the home straight (through Reigate)…

It’s late July and it seems summer has finally joined us (cue random torrential downpour while the sun is still shining). I’m actually a bit gutted…I much prefer running in the colder winter weather, so it’s going to be hard work for the next couple of months to keep active. I know from my day job (at Women in Sport) that this actually bucks the trend as research shows that there is a drop off of female runners in the autumn and winter months – I always try to be different.

So as I said we are now 7 months into the year, this year isn’t an ordinary one for me, this year I get married. It’s a very exciting and busy time…wedmin is my life. When I got engaged (September 2015) and once the date had been set (December 2016) I decided to add to the chaos and set myself a challenge. Upon awkwardly purchasing my first bridal magazine, I realised that in addition to endless advice on overpriced cakes, photo booths and colour schemes, most offered a plan of how to get fit and healthy for your wedding. Some of the plans looked complex and crazy and really did reflect an uphill run at Greenwich Park! So I thought that rather than panicking 3 months out that my dress might not fit, I would commit to some sort of activity across the year – a slow and steady way to tone up and most importantly feel good for the big day. So…I invented the Wedding 10k Series…it has a nice ring to it don’t you think? In essence I committed myself, oh yes and my future husband, to run one 10k a month for 12 months in the lead up to our wedding. So a total of 12 10ks, 120k total.

I do love a challenge. I have completed so many over the past 10 years – Yorkshire 3 peaks, Run to the Beat Half Marathon, Thames Bridges Bike ride to name a few, but these have all been one off events, this would be different.

Oh and before I explain our journey so far it’s imperative to mention that I wouldn’t class myself as a ‘runner’. I’m a Netballer by trade, team sport enthusiast. Yes, I have dabbled in running, probably more that I care to admit, but I am not particularly fast or elegant (in fact definitely not the latter). My mind-set has shifted slightly, but I’m pretty sure when December rolls around I will still refer to myself as a Netballer.

So why 10k? 5k is easy right? Well, not quite, but for me it’s not too unpleasant, it’s kind of over just as you get into it and it’s less of an event. So 10k seemed a bit more of a challenge, not anything like a half (never doing one of those again by the way) but just the right mix of pushing yourself and getting knackered! Interestingly, for two very competitive people, it’s not been about the times for us – we have improved our PBs massively, but we are pleased to just get round some of the courses.

So in December last year I officially entered the world of running – trawling websites to sign up to local runs. We have always had two events booked in advance and found it relatively easy to find runs nearby. The Wedding 10k Series started in Windsor, around Dorney Lake. It wasn’t quite how I pictured our first event to go – picture the scene, two weary runners set off having just returned from a 3-week trip in Asia, it was a struggle and 8k was not our friend, but we managed it and were pretty chuffed at the end. Since then we have done Richmond, Maidstone, Battersea Park, Windsor Trails, Greenwich Park and Clapham Common. We are officially half way – for August we are running at the Olympic Park and September we are taking part in Run Reigate!

Jennie - Winter

September was a tricky one, but when we stumbled across Run Reigate we booked it straight away. We live in South West London and have probably exhausted all of the key ones in our area so are pleased to be going a bit further afield. The website was great and although slightly more expensive than other runs we have done, I like the vibe and it seems worth it. The process to book was probably one of the easiest we have gone – as let me tell you some are hard work as you have to book separately for each individual.

I already like the feel of Run Reigate – I have been following them on Twitter and saw last week that they have made some improvements from their inaugural event last year, I like that approach. All of the feedback from last year seems really positive too and this morning it was announced that Olympic legend Dame Kelly Holmes is starting the race. I have to say I am impressed…fingers crossed she will present us with our 9th medal (hint, hint)!

As I mentioned before I work for Women in Sport, we are the UK’s leading charity aiming to transform sport for the benefit of every woman and girl. Wo do lots of research and lobbying for more women and girls to be involved in sport, whether it be playing, working or watching. As a result, it means I look at running events differently – I look from a personal perspective as an active woman, but I also look with a deep understanding of women’s perceptions and values that drive their decisions to start and continue running. Run Reigate has done well on both fronts, the communications denote a friendly run with a community atmosphere, while still offering a good challenge. The website is also great too, showing ‘real women’ and not just sporting runners in lycra taking part!

We have been roping in friends to run with us throughout the journey and hope to have a few with us as Reigate. So if you are taking part in Run Reigate, look out for us and give us a cheer, we will definitely need the encouragement!  


Run Reigate would like to wish Jennie and her husband-to-be, good luck in their Wedding 10K series and all the best for the big day!

St Catherine's Hospice Runner

St. Catherine’s Hospice – Charity Partner

Many people think a hospice is a place where people spend their final moments, but at St Catherine’s Hospice the focus is on helping people make the most of the time they have left.

The local hospice encourages patients to live well and recognises that people are more than their illness; it’s not their diagnosis, but their individual wishes and needs that matter most to the people at St Catherine’s.

Committed to providing the local community with the best possible end of life care, the local hospice has been providing free, expert care to people across Sussex and Surrey for the last 30 years. Last year, more than 2,000 patients were cared for at the hospice and in the comfort of their own homes, including 175 patients from Reigate*.

As well as tailored practical care, St Catherine’s also offers people: emotional support, welfare advice, spiritual care, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, complementary therapies and creative activities such as music and art. The hospice recognises that, at such a challenging time, emotional support is just as important as the physical care they provide, and are also there to offer support and advice to families, friends and carers.

Although their services are free, each day it costs St Catherine’s more than £17,000 to provide their care. Receiving less than a third of their running costs from the NHS, for the rest, the hospice relies on the generosity and support of the local community. By supporting Run Reigate, you’re helping ensure St Catherine’s can be there for people in future, when and where they are needed most – there can be no better motivation to run.

If you would like to find out more about how you can help support St Catherine’s, please visit: or call 01293 447361.

*Town figures from 2014/2015

One of our runners…

Joelle is just one runner taking part in Run Reigate and raising money for St Catherine’s Hospice.  Joelle was kind enough to give her thoughts about running for St Catherine’s this year.

“I ran last year and although it was tough I really enjoyed the atmosphere and the satisfaction of running my first half marathon. I knew a couple of my friends, (Kate and Romy) were keen and so once I saw we could run for St Catherine’s, the decision was made.  We all agreed it was a great reason to sign up!

I work at Reigate Manor and St Catherine’s is our chosen charity because it does wonderful things for people in our local community, we’ve also got our General and Assistant Managers to sign up to take part.

We each have a target of £250 but would ideally like to raise more.  We will have a JustGiving page which we will put all over Facebook and Twitter and just generally pester our friends and families to give as generously as they can!

Training is the hardest part, between us we have six children aged two to six and are juggling work and various other commitments.  We have to try and run in the evenings and weekends but we all have different schedules so we just get out for a run whenever we can.

It’s much more fun running together!

Running 13.1 miles and raising money for such a worthy charity gives you the biggest sense of achievement.  If you’re thinking about doing it in future years, just do it!”


If you would like to raise money for St. Catherine’s Hospice whilst running this year’s Run Reigate, please get in touch.

Taking the first steps on your half marathon training plan

Taking the first steps on your half marathon training plan

Need to kick-start your training for Run Reigate? Hannah Brookes shares her motivation tips for tackling the miles.

Run Reigate isn’t far away and getting closer by the day. I should be racking up the half marathon training miles on runs by now but my running efforts have been somewhat lackadaisical of late. I love the challenge of a long run and usually find building up my distance week by week to be more satisfying than the race itself. However, I just can’t seem to get in the zone.

In case I’m not alone, here are a few things that have previously helped me get my butt into gear when training for races.

Establish a routine as quickly as you can

To be honest, this is probably what’s been holding me back thus far. As a creature of habit, I find a routine is the best way to keep on track when training. It’s oddly easier to lace up my trainers when I tell myself there’s no choice. Sunday is Long Run Day – no ifs, no buts.

Everyone is different so it’s important to establish a routine that works for you. Personally, I can’t run in the evenings. Once I’m home, I’m done for the day. However, I have no qualms about getting up at 6am and heading out for an early morning jog.

The last time I trained for a big event, I found this routine worked well for me:

  • Mon – rest day
  • Tues – run in the morning before work
  • Wednesday – run home from work (the only acceptable evening run)
  • Thursday – rest day
  • Friday – run in the morning before work
  • Saturday – rest day
  • Sunday – long run

I should probably point out this isn’t an optimal training plan for a person planning to achieve a super-speedy time (some interval training and cross training is required for that). However, I found this was a routine I could stick to and allowed enough flex to fit in non-running activities during the week.

Remember why you’re running in the first place

It’s amazing how motivating a little mental focus can be. When I first got into running, my goal was to run far enough to get a silver foil cape at the end. Forget the medal! I also liked to imagine the feeling of accomplishment when crossing the finish line –  for someone who isn’t a natural runner (I always came last in cross country at school), that’s more motivating than getting a new personal best.

So why are you running Run Reigate? Whatever the answer, think about that every time you’re tempted to skip a training run. Stick a post-it on your trainers, rename the alarm on your phone or get your best friend to remind you every time you speak to them.

Bonus tip: good views on your training runs can also be very motivating

Bonus tip: good views on your training runs can also be very motivating

Set smaller goals along the way

A half marathon can be a very daunting distance, especially if it’s your first time running a race of that length. If you’re feeling a bit put off, try setting yourself smaller goals along the way. Over the summer, there are loads of 5k and 10k races that you can incorporate into your training plan – Runner’s World has a handy list so you can search for events taking place near you.

If you’ve never taken part in an organised race before, I’d definitely recommend signing up to at least one before Run Reigate. Race day is completely different from a training run, with more people to dodge but crowds of people to cheer you on. A 5k or 10k race will help you overcome any nerves and give you the boost you need to carry on with your training.

Hopefully I’ve given you a few ideas to get you motivated. What else would you recommend to a runner struggling with their training? Tweet your suggestions via @RunReigate.

Thanks for reading!

Hannah Brookes


Dave Kelly & Daren Elliott


Run Reigate is well and truly up and running!

Well I have spent the morning with David Kelly the Race Director of the Reigate Half Marathon, 10K and New Kids Race.

With 8am on a Wednesday morning in July planned for our meeting in Reigate’s Priory Park I jog over to our meeting place and shake the hand of the person I have arranged to meet, smiles all round.

About me, well nothing out of the ordinary really. I have been a runner for many years, I have coached athletics and running with my local Athletics club, tried my hand at pace making over half Marathon and Marathon distance and am an Ambassador with the Brighton based Run Brighton Group.

So the meeting was about the purposed route change or tweak of the hilly section in the last couple of miles of the Reigate Half Marathon, the hilly section in question had received a bit of negative feedback and when brought to David’s attention to his credit he set out to do something about this.

How is it that you can run with a person you have just met and you can feel totally at ease, the conversation flows and the miles slip by, yet stand in a lift or on a train and there is complete silence.

Well, David introduced me to the Reigate 10k course which has a cracking first fast section and ample room to stretch your legs if you’re looking for a fast time, then we had reached the tweaked and improved section of the Reigate Half, yes it’s still a hill but nowhere near the incline from last September. In fact it was a very nice and shady climb not too heavy on the legs or lungs at all.

Within no time at all we were at the top of the now “not so hilly section” and were turning the corner to the side entrance of the Majestic Priory Park, this is where it all happens, this is when you know you have almost completed a half marathon because on the day you will be greeted by hundreds of cheering people all urging you on the last few balloon and ticker tape filled yards to the finish line.

Well we talked and ran, David told me about a fantastic new children’s race which is also taking place and will help to get kids fit and have fun…………Yes I had a very pleasant morning starting out running with a stranger and finishing with a friend.

Daren Elliott, Husband, Father, Runner…………in that order!