Mrs Hatton

St Catherine’s Hospice – Runner’s Blog


Jenny Hatton is just one of 21 runners taking part in Run Reigate in aid of St Catherine’s Hospice. Here she shares why she’s taking on the challenge this September:

“My mum, Mary, was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in December 2014. She’d beaten bowel cancer several years previously and sailed through her treatment, she even drove herself to and from her radiotherapy appointments in Guildford. When Mum was diagnosed and told that the cancer was incurable, she took the decision not to have treatment. She’d been offered palliative chemotherapy on a Wednesday but that was the day she met up with her friends for lunch every week and she viewed that as a much better form of ‘treatment’. Mum chose quality of life over quantity, a decision I fully respected and supported and although she fought bravely and stoically, she passed away in November 2015.

The team at St Catherine’s supported us during Mum’s final months. Mum didn’t want to go into the hospice for respite care “in case I don’t come out” but after several very tough days at home she went into the hospice for 10 days and then didn’t want to leave. She stayed there for three weeks. The staff were so caring and kind, nothing was too much trouble; they laughed with us and cried with us, supported us and just held our hands at a very difficult time. They were there at any time of day or night, which was so reassuring.

Mrs Hatton

When Mum went into St Catherine’s, she had completely lost her appetite and had eaten very little for days but I remember her being given a bowl of chocolate sponge and sauce on arrival and she ate the lot. She visibly relaxed and you could sense her relief at being there. St Catherine’s is an incredible place, the drinks trolley goes round at 5pm, a neighbouring cat comes in and takes up residence on patients’ beds and anything that can be done is done to make everyone feel at ease – Mum was a big horse racing fan and they arranged for a copy of the Racing Post to be delivered to her every day. 

We had arranged a party for Mum six weeks before she passed away. A gathering of more than 60 of her friends, neighbours and colleagues, many travelling from far and wide to be there. Mum had been in St Catherine’s for 10 days prior to the party and without their support the party would not have taken place. One of the nurses at St Catherine’s helped Mum get ready for the party and she was well enough to attend and enjoy the day. It was wonderful and I have many photos and happy memories as does everyone who was there.

I took part in the first Run Reigate Half Marathon in 2014 which went past Mum’s front door. She came out to watch and although the route has been changed, it feels right that I should take part in the race on 18 September in her memory. St Catherine’s works with people and they were there for me and Mum when it mattered. I do not know what we would have done without them.”

To find out more about how you can support St Catherine’s please visit www.stch.org.uk or to support Jenny with her fundraising please visit: http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/JennyHatton

 

DKH_2016

Dame Kelly Holmes at Run Reigate


Last week’s blog was all about inspiration.  As our thoughts turn to the Olympics,  there are few more inspirational runners than Dame Kelly Holmes…

Dame Kelly Holmes is a legend in many ways.  Winner of gold in the 800m and 1500m distances at the 2004 Athens Olympics and she is still the holder of the 600m, 800m and 1,000m British records.  She has been an inspiration for thousands of young people to take up middle distance running.  Dame Kelly also spent 6 years as the President of the English Commonwealth Games.  She is a great supporter of charitable work and has set up her own, the Dame Kelly Holmes Trust – more about this later.

Helping to Make Run Reigate Even More Special

It will be amazing to have Dame Kelly with us on the big day and we’ll be keeping her really busy!  Ranging from starting our races, awarding prizes to the winners and handing medals out to some of the kids in their events.  If at any point you see her jogging between roles, please do not take this as an opportunity to race her.  It will be embarrassing for everyone concerned, especially when she beats you…

Dame Kelly Holmes

Your Chance to Meet Dame Kelly Holmes

Yes, you can have the chance to meet her in person!  Dame Kelly Holmes will be hosting an exclusive Race Reception with 30 winners.  The raffle is open to all registered runners, you just have to buy a £3 ticket to be entered into the draw.

The “VIP Race Reception”:

  • Only open to the 30 winners of the raffle
  • You will hear exclusive background and tips from this Olympic legend
  • Be hosted in a VIP tented marquee
  • Ask questions and get photos with a national running hero
  • Get your Run Reigate exclusive finishers t-shirt signed
  • Drinks and light refreshments also provided

Tickets are £3 each or 4 for £10

To sign up for the raffle you must be registered for this year’s event, then enter at https://register.canbook.me/e/shop/10199.   If you haven’t signed up yet, you can buy tickets when you book your place online.  Entries close 11.59pm on Sunday 4th September and winners will be notified within 24 hours.  You can enter as many times as you like (no one will judge you for stalking).

Kelly’s Heroes

All proceeds, and we’re hoping to raise a great deal of raffle prize money, will be given directly to Dame Kelly’s charities, for whom she is hoping to raise a staggering £250,000 this year.  These are all organisations that are close to her heart which she calls Kelly’s heroes because of the time and care they give to people in need.  For more information about each of the charities, including her own Trust, which supports disadvantaged young people, please click on the links below:

The Dame Kelly Holmes Trust

Mind UK

Myeloma

Hospice in the Weald

Pickering Cancer Care Charity

Run Reigate are delighted to be able to support all of these community charities and would greatly appreciate it if you could dig deep in your pockets to support them too.  However if you’re not one of the lucky winners, don’t worry, you’ll have plenty of opportunity to see her around and about at the event.

We’re more excited than ever about the big day now and we hope you are too!  If you haven’t entered either the 10K or half-marathon don’t worry, there’s still time to sign-up and join in the fun.  2016 is going to be Run Reigate’s best event yet!

 

St Catherine's Hospice Runner

St. Catherine’s Hospice – Charity Partner


Many people think a hospice is a place where people spend their final moments, but at St Catherine’s Hospice the focus is on helping people make the most of the time they have left.

The local hospice encourages patients to live well and recognises that people are more than their illness; it’s not their diagnosis, but their individual wishes and needs that matter most to the people at St Catherine’s.

Committed to providing the local community with the best possible end of life care, the local hospice has been providing free, expert care to people across Sussex and Surrey for the last 30 years. Last year, more than 2,000 patients were cared for at the hospice and in the comfort of their own homes, including 175 patients from Reigate*.

As well as tailored practical care, St Catherine’s also offers people: emotional support, welfare advice, spiritual care, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, complementary therapies and creative activities such as music and art. The hospice recognises that, at such a challenging time, emotional support is just as important as the physical care they provide, and are also there to offer support and advice to families, friends and carers.

Although their services are free, each day it costs St Catherine’s more than £17,000 to provide their care. Receiving less than a third of their running costs from the NHS, for the rest, the hospice relies on the generosity and support of the local community. By supporting Run Reigate, you’re helping ensure St Catherine’s can be there for people in future, when and where they are needed most – there can be no better motivation to run.

If you would like to find out more about how you can help support St Catherine’s, please visit:

www.stch.org.uk or call 01293 447361.

*Town figures from 2014/2015

One of our runners…

Joelle is just one runner taking part in Run Reigate and raising money for St Catherine’s Hospice.  Joelle was kind enough to give her thoughts about running for St Catherine’s this year.

“I ran last year and although it was tough I really enjoyed the atmosphere and the satisfaction of running my first half marathon. I knew a couple of my friends, (Kate and Romy) were keen and so once I saw we could run for St Catherine’s, the decision was made.  We all agreed it was a great reason to sign up!

I work at Reigate Manor and St Catherine’s is our chosen charity because it does wonderful things for people in our local community, we’ve also got our General and Assistant Managers to sign up to take part.

We each have a target of £250 but would ideally like to raise more.  We will have a JustGiving page which we will put all over Facebook and Twitter and just generally pester our friends and families to give as generously as they can!

Training is the hardest part, between us we have six children aged two to six and are juggling work and various other commitments.  We have to try and run in the evenings and weekends but we all have different schedules so we just get out for a run whenever we can.

It’s much more fun running together!

Running 13.1 miles and raising money for such a worthy charity gives you the biggest sense of achievement.  If you’re thinking about doing it in future years, just do it!”

 

If you would like to raise money for St. Catherine’s Hospice whilst running this year’s Run Reigate, please get in touch.

Kids

Inspiring Kids to Become Regular Runners


It takes time, effort, inspiration and love – along with a healthy dose of patience and humour to look after our children these days.  With so many more distractions to keep them indoors, what does it take to get them active (….that doesn’t involve hunting Pokemon down in the streets of Reigate)?  Karen Hanmore is our wildly energetic and ever-enthusiastic Run Reigate Kids Race Manager.  We want to share some of her journey during the last few months.

Since our first year there has been great demand for us to introduce a kids race and I can see why.  In our family it’s not going to be long till my 9 year old daughter can take me in a sprint race … I’m going to have to up my game or ask for a head start.

It took nearly 3 months to pin down exactly what kind of kids race Run Reigate would be.  Not just any old kids run, but rather something very different – something which would embody them being active and spur them on to regular running, whilst having lots of fun.  We thought about the event we’re best known for, the half-marathon, and from there the seeds were planted and the idea of a kids cumulative version grew.  So 12 miles needed to be completed bit by bit, week in week out between Easter and September, with the grand finale 1.1 miles on race day.

Putting this particular race together has been a big job for the team as a whole, but in particular for Karen.  We were fortunate that camera and printer giant Canon (headquartered in Reigate) shared our vision and got involved from the onset to sponsor the event.   This has helped us resource it and to give the whipper snappers all the good stuff the grown-ups receive.

The next big job was to try to get all the local schools involved and, with 58 of them across Reigate & Banstead, that was always no mean feat.  They’ve all been wonderful and keen to engage with us – to date Karen (sometimes with Dave our Race Director) has presented at 25 assemblies throughout the borough, battling through armies of excited youngsters and ensuring that each and every child knew they were warmly encouraged to take part.   The Run Reigate team appreciates just how many schools have embraced the challenge, facilitating running sessions during term time and all the support for the idea we have received.  As we write this, there are now children registered from over 150 schools, some as far away as London and Brighton.

Kids Race

Run Reigate at Dunnottar School

Some schools, such as Lime Tree in Merstham, have gone above and beyond, sponsoring 16 of their children to take part and having a sign up rate of over 50% of the whole school!   As Karen’s own children attend the school, she was inspired to start a running club there to encourage the pupils to see how much fun running can be.  Every morning they meet, warm up and enjoy a variety of games including tag, relays, pyramids as well as timed laps so they can see their progression.  It’s not competitive so that everyone feels they have a place.

Back to the event.  The kids race will have it’s own start gantry in the park with a 1.1 mile route that joins up onto the tree-lined adults infrastructure, concluding at the finish in front of Priory School and thousands of spectators including all the adults fresh in from the Half Marathon and 10k.  Here in a closed, controlled area, they will be awarded their full half-marathon medal – same as the adults, along with their high quality technical t-shirt, banana, water and kids goody bag. Parents – no nabbing those medals for yourselves now!

One of the most inspiring outcomes for us have been the amazing kids we’ve met along the way, many of whom Karen now regularly bumps into around town.  One little girl even joined her this week whilst she was running laps of Priory lake to keep her company!

We’re delighted that so many families and schools have been keen to take part this year.  Places have gone really quickly and it looks as though we will sell out prior to the event which is very exciting.  If you haven’t booked your kids place already, you might want to soon.  We hope all the kids have a fantastic summer holiday and please keep them running just for fun.

Don’t forget you can track the miles your kids run on our website – any questions, just drop us a line through the contact page.

The reaction to our first kids cumulative half marathon been inspiring, as has the reaction of schools, teachers, parents, sponsors and kids.  In this wonderful Olympic year, sporting inspiration shouldn’t be hard to come by, but maybe some of it will be closer to home than you think.

 

Run Reigate Race Start

Your Turn? Advice for entering your first race


After watching Sunday’s London Marathon, did you force your way into your cupboard, past the ironing board, pull your trainers out from under the bike pump and picnic blanket, remove the dead spider, brush away the dust and say to yourself “I’m going to run a marathon next year”.  Watching the London Marathon is so motivational, either as part of the crowds lining the streets, or on the TV, and every year thousands of viewers will be inspired to run the magical route.  Don’t let it just be a dream, if all those ‘normal looking folks’ can do it, so can you.  Here’s some advice to get you started…

IMAG0829

Trainer Time

First of all, those trainers that you dusted off which were popular in the 90s, have probably had their day and you should get yourself a new pair.  There are all manner of highly technical running shoes out there now, which not only look good, but also do useful things such as flexibility in the right places, superior cushioning, traction, gait support and breathability.  It’s well worth a trip to a running shoe specialist, such as Reigate’s Simply Sports, who can provide expert advice on the right trainer for you.

Join the Club

For many people, one of joys of running is the quiet ‘me’ time.  However If you’re serious about running a long distance, but nervous about embarking on this kind of journey on your own, it’s worthwhile finding someone to train with, or better yet, joining a running club.  As well as the coaching, you will find seasoned runners to give you advice on technique and lengthening your runs.  Even if you enjoy the solitude of running, being part of a group once a week, can help with your speed, endurance and motivation on those tough days.  Unlike some of your friends, these people will not drift into a light sleep as you chat about your new glow in the dark kit, or a blow by blow account of your favourite routes.  They love it as much as you do!

Plan of Attack

Whether you’re training for your first 5K or a marathon, you should always have a strategy. It is strangely satisfying, marking off each training run from your plan on the fridge door – even if you’ve actually missed it, but feel that it’s wrong to leave it untouched!  A plan gives you focus, makes sure you train enough, but not too much – and helps you build up the miles at an appropriate speed so that you don’t over do it too early and end up with a jammy ankle.  Runner’s World is a fantastic source for plans, as well as just about any other running question that you might have.

Power Up

As well as a running programme, it’s worthwhile scheduling in some other strength/cross training.  It helps prevent injuries, improve general fitness, recovery and it can be fun to exercise in a different way at times when you’re struggling with your running mojo.  This can come in the form of a fitness class (like British Military Fitness), gym sessions, swimming, cycling, spinning,  etc.  It’s important to look after your core strength, and running alone won’t do that.  Yoga, Pilates or some other form of stretching is also equally important and can really help with the restoration of those tired legs.

Race, Race and Race Again

Running a marathon is a pretty daunting prospect on its own.  However if you start planning in some races over the coming months, you can stop it from seeming such a mammoth goal.  If you’re new to longer distances start with a 10K and move up to half-marathon distances a few months after that.  Reigate Priory Athletic Club have a 10K race in July, which you could then follow with Run Reigate’s Half Marathon on the 18th September.  Regular Saturday Park Runs can help you to monitor your speed progress too.  Runner’s World has a comprehensive race list for the year, from 5K to Ultra (should you be so inspired).

Giving Back

Finally, the odds of getting a ballot place for the London Marathon are slim: but don’t despair.  There are hundreds of places with charities looking for first time runners, as long as you can achieve the sponsorship goal which is usually around the £2,000+ mark.  Charity runners for the Virgin London Marathon have raised over £300 million to date, which is phenomenal.  Apart from supporting a fantastic cause, other benefits of running for a charity include the support they offer, running advice, cheer points, being part of a team, a post-race party with a free sports massage and of course, not to forget the all important t-shirt.  Why not start raising money for one of our charities when you sign up to compete in either our 10K or Half Marathon.

If however, in the coming weeks you decide against running a marathon, it’s still worth entering Run Reigate as we have 2 great challenging distances, a kids race and a fantastic community atmosphere in Priory Park for all the family to enjoy.  Plus you’ll have some lovely new trainers…

 

 

BMF Marathon team

The Run Reigate Guide to Surviving the London Marathon!


You’ve trained for months, you’ve planned your route, worn in your new trainers, picked out your most comfortable kit and finally the big race day is here.  Many of our wonderful Run Reigate runners will join with 36,000 others next Sunday, to take part in one of the world’s biggest and most famous distance races, the London Marathon.   Our local British Military Fitness crew have entered a massive team, running to raise money for The Children’s Trust, one of our own charities and we wish them all the best of luck.

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For any first time marathon runner, it can be daunting, and we’re not talking covering the 26.2 miles.  It’s more than just physical endurance: the marathon is a logistical, biological and psychological obstacle course. For those of you getting ready to race, the Run Reigate team have come up with a few alternative tips to help you on your way…

Get greased up

Lather yourself in vaseline before you start (including your feet), even in places that are unlikely to chafe – trust us it really helps! Turn yourself into a big slippery sea-lion.  Added benefits include sliding your way to the front of your pen.  If you suffer from hayfever, rub a big dollop on your nose as prevents the pollen from getting in.  

Go before you go

There are loads of portaloos.  Hundreds in fact, but they will still have a long queue in the hour before the race.  It is OK to stand in line, get to the front, do your business, then return to the end of the queue and repeat … 3 times.  You’ll be thankful for this cleanse when you see everyone veering off to the side as soon as they’ve crossed the start line to wee in public.  

On your marks, get ready … hang around a bit!

And you’re off … or not as the case will probably be.  Unless you are an elite runner, the start can be a bit of an anti-climax as you often have to wait 5-10 minutes to get across the start line and the pace can be a little slow.  Distract yourself by loudly humming “Eye of the Tiger”.

Resist the Rhino

There will be an urge to sprint past everyone in fancy dress.  Their attire can be deceptive.  The guy dressed as a giant penguin is actually an Olympic Triathlete and he’ll mess with your head by speeding up as you attempt to overtake him.  It may be a blow to your confidence to find a foam fire hydrant ahead of you at mile 18, but it makes for a good anecdote later.  Much later.

People power-ups

The closest many of us will ever come to feeling like we’re in the Olympics, is crossing Tower Bridge.  The volume builds as you run down Tooley Street, with an explosion of noise as you turn on to the bridge, people clapping, banging tubes and shouting your name.  If you have an unusual name, they might shout something else, but don’t heckle them.  It’s OK to wave at people and high five the kids.  Spectators – bring hand sanitiser.

Mind your step

Everyone who has run a marathon will tell you to watch out for the drinks bottles on the ground.  But seriously, do, and it starts early.  One of our team slipped on a discarded bottle at mile 16 of the New York Marathon, horribly tearing her hamstring.  Being the tough nut she is, she walked the remainder in agony, doggedly determined to earn that bloomin’ medal!  The gel packets are just as bad and slimey.  They sometimes stick to your trainer, forcing you to remove it whilst hopping ungainly, racers behind accidentally grabbing you in a hug as they crash into you.  

Where’s Wally?

It’s definitely worthwhile knowing where your supporters are going to be so that you can pick them out, quite literally, in a crowd.  Banners, signs, fancy hats, unusual cheers or just really really loud voices are useful.  Especially in the final stretch, when you’ve forgotten your own name.

Salty beards

Some marathon runners sport an attractive salt beard when they finish the race, which always looks good in the photos and can be a surprise to their partners.  Shows you’ve really worked hard!  Replace the electrolytes through gels and energy drinks during the race, and fish and chips afterwards.

You’ve made it!

Once you’ve crossed the line it really is straightforward.  Be gently pushed by the race marshals  towards your photo and bag and start crying with joy.  Have cosy clothes to put on even if it’s not cold, as you will be soon.  Have snacks in your bag too, not just with your family or friends as they might have eaten them.  Really, there should be a big conveyor belt at the end just like the airport, where you are collected by someone, preferably with a wheelchair and a bottle of prosecco in the arm rest cup holder.

Think Dalek

Avoid steps, at all costs.  If you must use them in the days pending the race, try sliding down like a toddler, as long as you have something or someone to pull you up at the end.  Ice baths are also recommended, but may result in weird noises coming from your mouth without your control.

Enjoy it!  

You’ve earned it.  Yes, it will be one of the hardest things you’ve ever done, but also one of the best.  The atmosphere and crowds are amazing and there is such a variety of people running that you’ll be continually inspired.   You might even be on the TV, so remember to smile, practise your crowd wave and of course, wear your Run Reigate finishers t-shirt for all to see.

Run Reigate Flags

“I am the Master of my Fate, I am the Captain of my Soul”


What does it take to become a ‘Marathon Man’?  And no, I don’t mean Dustin Hoffman enduring some rogue dentistry.  Just as some of us mere mortals work up to running our first 10K, half or full marathon, Rob Young and Eddie Izzard have completed amazing mental and physical feats that take endurance running to a new elevation, earning themselves the title of Marathon Man.

Extreme races are springing up all over the world, as some runners look for the next level of fortitude.  The legendary Marathon Des Sables started on Friday, in its 28th year and is according to many “The Toughest Race on Earth”.  It’s an ultra, run over 6 days on a course of around 150 miles, in nearly 50C degree heat. The website claims, “Any idiot can run an Ultra marathon, but it takes a special kind of idiot to run the Marathon Des Sables”.  The athletes who run these distances are able to tap into an inner tenacity, that many of us don’t feel we have.

Rob Young had that inner belief.  He also had a very unusual start.  After watching the London Marathon in 2014, his girlfriend bet him 20p that he couldn’t run 26.2 miles.  With an offer like that, what Scot could say no (as a fellow Scot, I am allowed to make that joke).  So Rob got up early the next morning and ran a marathon before work.  He didn’t stop there though – Rob then ran marathons or ultras consecutively for 420 days, covering the same distance as 476 marathons and 11,700 miles in one year.  He won 96 of the races and set some world records on the way.  In January 2015, he set off on a 3,100 mile race across America from LA to Washington DC, which he won by 30 hours, even though in the middle of it he flew back to compete in the London Marathon, an homage to the start of his personal journey.    

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Although Rob had been an athlete when he was young, competing for GB as a triathlete in the 20-24 age group, he hadn’t been running regularly before commencing this amazing feat.  Rob has carried on competing in marathons and ultras.  Studies have shown that his ability to run marathon day after day is extraordinary and that his pain threshold must be very high.  However, athleticism and the ability to tolerate pain do not necessarily make an extreme athlete and he has created purpose from his running that drives him on.  He has raised thousands of pounds for worthy charities that support kids.  He’s a man who clearly believes you are master of your own destiny, deciding to push himself to unparalleled goals and smashing them.    

‘Marathon Men’ don’t have to be athletes.  Eddie Izzard is a hero in our house, ever since my brother introduced me to the ‘Definite Article’ when I was a student.  I know he’s a man of mind over matter.  He has chosen to perform his shows in French, German, Spanish, Russian and Arabic, languages he didn’t even speak, just to challenge himself.  He took this fabulous mindset to endurance running, when in the UK in 2009 and with only 5 weeks training he ran 43 marathons in 51 days, covering 1,100 miles for Sports Relief.  After a foiled attempt in 2012, due to serious medical issues, to run 27 marathons in 27 days in honour of Nelson Mandela’s imprisonment on Robben Island, Eddie came back in 2016 to complete the challenge.  For many people, the weight of such a massive previous disappointment might pull them down, but determinedly he forced his way through, promising to himself and the millions of viewers following him that he would run, walk or crawl his way through the blazing 30C degree heat to complete the challenge and help raise over £2 million for Sports Relief.  In his BBC3 documentary, he reads William Ernest Henley’s ‘Invictus’, a poem that inspired the resilience of Nelson Mandela and clearly at times a mantra for Eddie has he fought his way along mile after mile.  Not a natural athlete, but a man whose mental strength allows him to achieve amazing physical feats.  His great recovery tips of how you can have a beer after a marathon as it has carbohydrates and water in it, show he is a man after my own heart.  Yes, I do love him!

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Being a ‘Marathon Man’ is not about gender.  Let us not forget some of the amazing women who have also been an inspiration to us and no, I’m not talking about myself here.  Apparently women in general are 3 x more likely to complete an ultra than men, not because of fitness, but rather because they are less likely to give up.  Ellie Greenwood is a two-time 100K World Champion and holds course records for a variety of ultra races.   She was the first Britain to win South Africa’s 90 km Comrades Marathon (the oldest ultra-marathon in the world)  in 2014, with a time of 6 hours and 18 minutes.  That’s averaging at 14.3 km per hour in sweltering heat.  We also of course have the wonderful Paula Radcliffe, a marathon legend who retired last year, still holding the women’s world marathon record which she made after just a year of marathon running.  She holds 9 other world records and has asthma!  These ladies have given their all.

When I trained for my first marathon a few years ago, I was dreading my big training runs.  The day I ran 20 miles, it was blowing a gale, snowing with sub-zero conditions.  I had to stop various times (which was the first time that had happened in a training run) and came home with a frozen mono-brow and zero belief that I could run 26.2 miles.  Then the weather turned and I galloped round my next long training run, feeling invincible (clearly this was only in my head and I have no doubt that I was actually shuffling along, being overtaken by sprightly pensioners).  Finishing the race a few weeks later, was without a doubt one of the greatest experiences of my life.  I’m not really a runner, but I had said I was going to do it, people had sponsored me, I was being tracked, pac-man style round the route and I didn’t want to let myself down – so I did it!  I am the Master of my Fate, I am the Captain of my Soul…

These Marathon Men are amazing and so are you.  The first step on any journey is deciding you’re going to do it.  So go on, sign up at www.runreigate.com and we’ll be there to cheer you on every step of the way.

 

Invictus, William Ernest Henley

Out of the night that covers me

Black as the pit from pole to pole,

I thank whatever gods may be

For my unconquerable soul.

 

In the fell clutch of circumstance

I have not winced nor cried aloud.

Under the bludgeonings of chance

My head is bloody, but unbowed.

 

Beyond this place of wrath and tears

Looms but the Horror of the shade,

And yet the menace of the years

Finds and shall find me unafraid.

 

It matters not how strait the gate,

How charged with punishments the scroll,

I am the master of my fate,

I am the captain of my soul.

Kids

Calling All Superheroes – Run Reigate Kids Race


If you are a parent, many of you will have had your kids waiting for you at the finish line of a big race, wildly cheering you on, proudly telling you they will run a half-marathon one day, whilst manhandling your precious sweaty medal to put on their own little neck?  Well, the Run Reigate team believe that budding running dreams could happen sooner rather than later …

We have been toying with the idea of a kids race since our inaugural year, but wanted to do something different that would capture the imagination of the next generation of runners.  An event that all kids, from reception to teenagers, can proudly take part in.  From there, the idea of a kids half-marathon was born: but not just any half-marathon.  Partnering with Reigate & Banstead Council, the Run Reigate Kids Race is part of the R&BeActive initiative to combat childhood obesity, and is sponsored by global camera and printer giant Canon.

We’re challenging kids to accumulate 12 miles by running regularly through their schools in the months leading up to September. Then, on Run Reigate race day (Sunday 18th) they complete the challenge by taking part in the exciting grand finale –  a 1.1 mile race in Priory Park to achieve the 13.1 miles – their very first half-marathon!    

With the help of our digital partners Jellyfish, we have built a dedicated safe website to track all of the amazing miles they run in the build-up to Race Day, along with some suggested mile long training routes around the local area.  If you’re also training for either our 10K or the half-marathon, maybe they can join you for part of one of your weekly sessions, or whilst you’re on holiday, making training a real family affair.  All local schools will be participating in the challenge, so kids can be part of their bigger school team, running with their teachers, inspiring their classmates and in turn being motivated by others.  Apart from the high quality bling, there will also be prizes for the winners in each age category.

If this is all sounds tempting, you might have some questions:

What do I need to do?  

You can register your kids at www.runreigate.com

Is there an age limit?  

Any school child can take place, from age 4 in Reception to age 15 in Year 11!  15 year olds have the option of either running the kids’ half-marathon or in the main 10K event.

Do they have to do the 12 miles in advance?  

Only if they want to.  If they prefer, they can simply join in and run for fun on Race Day

Is my school involved?  

Yes, every school in Reigate & Banstead has been invited to participate, so you should hear about it soon from them.

What time is it?  

There will be 5 kids races split into class year groups:

  • 12.00 – Years 11, 10 & 9
  • 12.10 – Years 8 & 7
  • 12.20 – Years 6, 5 & 4
  • 12.35 – Years 3 & 2
  • 12.50 – Year 1 & Reception.

How many places are there?  

As this event will be popular, we are limiting the 2016 race to 2,000 places in total.

How much does it cost?  

£12, which covers the cost of running the event, a technical race t-shirt and an amazing medal – the same one as the adult half-marathon and 10K runners will receive!  It’ll stop them from nabbing yours.

Can they run for charity?  

Yes!  We will provide entrants with a sponsorship form where they can raise money (e.g. £1 per mile) and run for a charity of their choosing or one of ours.

What else will there be for kids to do?  

There will be a host of FREE fun activities for kids of all ages in the Move Revolution Kids Active Zone (last year we hosted over 1,500 kids who didn’t want to leave!).  There will also be live music, ice-cream, gourmet burgers, fresh pizza and smoothies in the Food Festival.

What about parking?  

We’ll have hundreds of parking spaces within a 5 minute walk of Priory Park.

Loos?  

Don’t worry….there are loads (and loads) of loos in the park.

Run Reigate has become a fantastic community focused event in Priory Park with an amazing atmosphere and a great day out for the whole family!   The addition of the Kids Race will make it even bigger and better and we’d love to have you and your children there, helping us make history as the UK’s first kids half-marathon.  

If you would like to enter the Kids Race, 10K or Half-Marathon, please register at www.runreigate.com.  Any questions, that are not covered online, please feel free to get in touch at karen.hanmore@runreigate.co.uk

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Join the fancy-dress parade!


Jonathan Pyle (Founder of The Purple Teapot Puppet Company) – talks to the Run Reigate team about dressing up for race day and why fancy dress is the way forward!

This will be my third Reigate Half Marathon for the Children’s Trust. Two years ago I ran to test my own level of fitness, impress my wife and children and at the same time raise some money for a very worthy cause. Last year ,however, I decided to do something a bit different, in an effort to increase the amount of sponsorship money I raised.

 As a result of reaching my target last year, I ran the half marathon in a horse costume. (Usually you inflate them but I filled mine up with cushions and material I found lying around the house as inflating it wasn’t an option !)

What I could never have anticipated, however, was the joy and fun it brought to all those children (and grown-ups) who came out to support us as we ran through their villages and past their houses giving us the vital support, encouragement and jelly babies we needed to keep us going. I could see children far in the distance pointing to ‘the funny man on a donkey’ and as I ran past ‘attempt’ to go into a trot. Not only that, but the encouragement from other runners and stewards on the day was one of the most heart-warming experiences I have ever had.

This year I will be running the half marathon in a different ‘costume.’ Again I will look silly and it may knock around 20 minutes off my personal best but it will be worth it to give something back to all those children (and grown-ups) who cheered me, and you, on last year. It would be wonderful to see more people ‘dress up’ for this year’s half marathon and put a smile on the faces of those that support us, irrespective of the charity you run are running for, maybe even raising more money in the process.

Jonathan Pyle (Founder of The Purple Teapot Puppet Company) 

http://purpleteapot.co.uk

 

 

 

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Air Ambulance needs you to Run Reigate


Kent, Surrey & Sussex Air Ambulance are celebrating their Silver Jubilee during 2015 and are hoping that you will choose to Run Reigate and raise money to help them continue to save lives into the next quarter century and beyond.

An independent charitable healthcare provider working with the Ambulance Service (not part of the NHS), they are funded almost entirely by voluntary donations.

The service has grown from one helicopter serving Kent only, to two aircraft serving those in need of emergency medical help across Surrey and East & West Sussex, as well as Kent, 24 hours a day.

The team consists of at least one pilot and a minimum of one Specialist Doctor and one Critical Care Paramedic. Once they are at the scene, they provide all the expertise and equipment that you would normally find in an A&E department. Such rapid assessment and treatment is vital in the cases that the crew attends, and goes a long way to enabling positive outcomes in the most traumatic of incidents.

The charity are offering free places to those who can pledge to raise sponsorship of £50 (for the 10K) or £140 (half marathon). Or, if you have your own place, you can still help the Air Ambulance by raising as much as you are able.

All those choosing to raise funds for Kent, Surrey & Sussex Air Ambulance through Run Reigate, will receive a charity running vest, promotional materials and a limited edition 25th Anniversary pin badge.

To find out more, click here or email Lauren Elphick laurene@kssairambulance.org.uk or call a member of the Community Team on 01622 833833.