Half Marathon Route

Run Reigate’s Half Marathon & 10K Routes


The Run Reigate team are delighted to confirm some small improvements and adjustments to the half marathon and 10K routes this year.  Only the latter part of the 2016 route is changing, mainly due to the extensive feedback we received last year from our runners and to a request we received from Surrey County Council in the wake of a planned rebuild of Flanchford Bridge this summer.  You may be wondering why we’re only releasing this now, however it takes a great deal of time to plan, agree and implement route changes with all the various parties and stakeholders involved.  That said, we hope you’ll be really pleased with the changes we’ve made and that this year’s races will be even better than ever!

Both races will again be held on fully closed roads all the way, incorporating beautiful country lanes and rural countryside, with fantastic and ever-enthusiastic community support all along the route.

Half Marathon

Both the half marathon and 10K races will once again start in a blaze of glory in front of the Priory School in Priory Park.  After leaving Priory Park through the Bell Street car park, runners will turn right onto Bell Street proceeding up Cockshot Hill and down the lovely fast incline into Woodhatch*.  At this point, the races part company with the half marathon turning left onto Lonesome Lane – a long, flat and very scenic route meandering wistfully to the south and eventually joining Meath Green Lane towards Horley.

In Horley, the route turns right onto Grove Road where you’ll hear the wonderful residents before seeing them, and leading into Hurst Road before proceeding right along Lee Street and Mill Lane towards the Black Horse Pub, a well-known local watering hole.   We then turn left onto Reigate Road heading south towards Gatwick before making a u-turn and turning back up to head north back up towards Reigate. Runners will again follow the unusually quiet and very scenic A217 all the way back into Reigate (about 4 miles) until they reach the Beehive Pub, where as we did last year, you turn left onto the residential and friendly Sandcross Lane.

It is at this point that the route deviates from 2015.  This year, runners will continue further up Sandcross Lane past Reigate Garden Centre before turning sharp left into the very pretty Whitehall Lane.  This new part of the route is very rural and on a nice gradual downward incline, before a right turn onto Slipshatch Road.  Rather than going up towards Flanchford Road (and  Littleton Manor Equestrian Centre) as we did last year, we turn right onto Clayhill Lane and then right onto a small loop comprising New North Road, Sandcross Lane and Park Lane East, before right onto Park Lane again towards the finish.  As is inescapable for Reigate, this last mile involves a short sharp incline – (aka a HILL…) however it’s fully surfaced and generally regarded by many runners as being much kinder than last year’s Bosh Hill.  We’re not going to lie – it’s there, some will find it hard but it is short and sharp and you’ll be over it before you know it.   What goes us MUST come down and runners are rewarded with a nice recovery decline before turning right and back into majestic Priory Park.   Follow the flags and the thousands of cheering people along the tree lined path to finish in front of the of the stage and the Priory where you started just a short time ago!

Run Reigate Half Marathon Route 2016

10K*

In Woodhatch, 10K runners will continue heading south along Dovers Green Road before making a u-turn shortly after Hartswood Sports Ground which will then re-join the main course in a northerly direction to create the required distance.  

Further information about the routes and the topography will be published on www.runreigate.com however if you have any questions, please feel free to get in touch with the team.  We will be delighted to answer any questions you may have.

Run Reigate 10k Route 2016

                      

Running to great beats!

Running – The Beat Goes On…


You’re running laps round Priory Park lake as part of your interval training.   The last couple of sprints have worn you out and your legs have no more to give.  But wait, the intro to Queen’s ‘Don’t Stop Me Now’ starts on your phone and you’re off, running like you’ve never run before (apart from the last time it came on) and you’ve cut 2 seconds off your PB – job done!

Training whilst listening to headphones is a contentious issue in the running community, polarising people in parks, tracks and towpaths up and down the country.  Apparently there are two types of runners, those who are “associators” who like to have inward focus when running and “dissociators” who need to focus outwards and be distracted by what how they might be feeling.  Let’s have a look at both sides of the debate:

FOR – The Budmeisters

Runners, especially those who are new to long distance, find music to be an excellent distraction when they are a few miles in and feeling weary.  

Studies have shown that external stimuli can block out fatigue, increase your concentration and leave you feeling positive.  

It can be particularly useful in fartlek/interval training, with pumping songs helping you to keep the short sprint sessions going.  

For those training for longer races on their own, it can also be nice company when you’re out for 2 hours on a Sunday morning, pounding the Surrey streets.

AGAINST – El Silencios

Many purists believe that you are better able to listen to your breathing and be attuned to your body and rhythm, when not distracted by music.  

One of the joys of running can also be that chance to clear your thoughts and empty your mind of the day’s issues, returning home in a much more peaceful state of mind.  

At times music can result in you running too fast – think Michael Jackson’s ‘Don’t Stop Till You Get Enough’ (or pass out) versus too slow such as Adele’s ‘Make You Feel My Love’ (running and crying don’t mix).  

You can also enjoy the beautiful nature that we have in Reigate, birds singing, squirrels leaping, leaves crunching and passers by shouting out warnings of dog poo ahead.   

IN-BETWEENERS

There are some runners who straddle these stereotypes choosing to have just one ear phone in, so they can listen to music and the outside world.  I personally am not able to multi-task in such a way and those people will only receive half of the wonder that is Kylie and Jason’s ‘Especially for You’.

Each to their own I say!  As long as you’re safe, watch out for small children and zombies …

SiS Runner

Run Reigate – The SiS Guide to Training


As well as producing some of the Run Reigate team’s favourite gels and recovery drinks, Science in Sport (SiS) also provide a wealth of training and nutrition advice which we’re really happy to share with you.  There are a variety of factors which can make the difference between you making it to the start line of your first half-marathon or 10K, or not!  First up is the most important element in any race preparation – training.  

RUN

There are three golden rules you should adhere to, to ensure you give yourself the best chance of starting, finishing and achieving your running dream:

R – Rest and recovery

These are two of the most underrated aspects of training.  DO NOT forget to rest and recover after hard-training.

U – Understand your limits

When it comes to endurance running, there are many things which are beyond your control.  Your “genetic potential” being one of them.

N – Never run on an injury

As tempting as it might be to try and ignore a muscle or tendon niggle, you are likely to make it far worse by running on it.

Training Intensity

Knowing how hard to push yourself is one of the hardest things to do when training for a race.  Your weekly training regime is a tricky balance between slow/steady sessions to build endurance and higher intensity sessions to increase your resistance to fatigue and increase your threshold.  

The question is how hard should you push?

Too Easy

Although slow and steady sessions are an important part of training, if performed too frequently, low intensity sessions can lead to a training plateau.

Too Hard

If you push yourself too hard, either by running too fast, too often or too far, then you are at risk of overloading your body and over stressing it – resulting in injury.

So, how do you gauge what intensity you should train at?

A heart rate monitor is an excellent way to ensure you are training at the right intensity.  If you don’t own one or need a guide, then check out the table below to get familiar with your “rate of perceived exertion”.

Rate of Perceived Exertion

R.P.E SCALE HOW YOU FEEL % HR MAX
1 Chilling, sitting down, feet up watching a movie 30-40%
2 A walk to the shops to get more popcorn 45-55%
3 A light jog 60-70%
4 A sociable pace, quicker than a job but able to chat 70-75%
5 Comfortable.  Got a good sweat on and you feel great 75-80%
6 Comfortable-ish.  You feel like it’s a good paced run 80-85%
7 Talking getting difficult.  Possible – but not very easy 85-90%
8 Only short answers to important questions possible 90-95%
9 Talking all but impossible 95% +
10 Talking is impossible.  You can only keep this intensity up for 10-15 seconds N/A

Approximate method to work out HRmax – true HRmax vary significantly from runner to runner.

Steady Paced Run (R.P.E. 3-5 or 70-80% HRmax)

A steady pace is just that – a pace which you can maintain for a long time  Steady paced runs will form a large part of your training.  This is the pace you should stick to for all your long weekend runs, as well as a good chunk of your mid-week runs too.  It helps build endurance and encourages the nervous and muscular systems to tolerate long distance running.

As you get fitter, you’ll find that not only will your “steady pace” get faster, but you’ll also be able to maintain that pace for longer without fatigue.

Tempo Paced Run (RPE 5-7 or 80-85% HRmax)

A tempo run is a pace which is a notch or two quicker than a steady pace.  At this intensity, talking is just about possible but you should only be able to manage “short-ish” sentences before need to take a breath.  

Beginners may initially find that a one or two mile tempo run is tough but a conditioned runner may be able to maintain tempo pace for a good eight miles and beyond.  Tempo session are excellent at increasing your tolerance to fatigue and should feature at least once a week in your training schedule.

Fartlek (RPE 6-8 or 85-90+% HRmax)

Fartlek is brilliant training but often underused by marathon runners.  It is based on a steady paced run but interspersed with periods of faster running at random times of your choice.  Vary the distance/time of the fast paced sections of these sessions to mix up the training stimulus and keep you interested.  Suggested times for fast sections can vary from 30 secs at RPE 8-9 to 5 mins at RPE 6-8.

Intervals (RPE 7-9 or 85+% HRmax)

Intervals are very similar to fartlek training. The key difference between them is that they are far more structured.  Interval sessions are excellent at increasing your threshold, thereby teaching the body to tolerate running at faster speeds.

E.g.

Distance/Time No. of intervals Rest between RPE % Max HR
1 mile 3-5 5-3 mins 6-8 80-90
5 minutes 4-8 1 min 6-7 80-90
800 meters 6-8 3-2 mins 7-8 85-95

As fitness improves – increase intervals, reduce rest time.  RPE will increase towards end of session.

By incorporating all of these training runs into your weekly regime you should be fully prepared for the Run Reigate Half-Marathon or 10K on Sunday 18th September.  To view the full SiS guide, please see http://www.scienceinsport.com/marathon-training-guide.

Good luck with your training!

 

History of the trainer

The Humble Trainer


The humble trainer – where would we runners be without it?  Much to the delight of Run Reigate’s founder Dave Kelly, one of the earliest recordings of organised running dates back to 1829 BC, the Tailteann Games, a sporting festival in Ireland in honour of Tailtiu, the goddess of butter … kidding.  These runners would probably only have had leather or animal strips covering their feet, if anything at all.  Today’s runners have an extensive choice of trainer, depending on their gait, ability and terrain preference.  Here’s more than you’ve ever probably wanted to know about the humble trainer…

Trainers that we know today were originally a British invention (of course), developed in  1832 by a chap called Wait Webster, who designed a process where rubber soles could be attached to leather shoes and boots.  By 1852 the plimsoll was born, widely worn by children.  The term plimsoll comes from the elastic band that joins the upper sole and resembles a “plimsoll line” on a ship’s hull.  Soon croquet and tennis players got in on the act and special soles were designed to provide more grip.  I’ve often had terrible slippage problems whilst playing croquet.  Then another Brit, Joseph William Foster (owner of Boulton which later became Reebok), added spikes to the bottom of the plimmies to make what we now know as running spikes.  

Next up came vulcanisation, a revolution in shoe manufacturing that had nothing to with Spock.  Vulcanisation is the process of melting rubber and fabric together, a mixture that then evolved to create treads and the start of the trainer as we know it – lightweight and flexible.  Goodyear, of tyre fame, started producing these shoes then known as ‘Keds’, in 1892, but it wasn’t until 1917 that they moved into the running field.  

Rudolf and Adolf ‘Adi’ Dassler from Germany started making their own shoes in their mother’s wash kitchen, after returning from the First World War and by the Second World War they were selling 200,000 pairs of shoes a year.  Post war they actually used surplus tent canvas and fuel tank rubber – now that’s what we call recycling!  As successful as they were, relationships turned sour during wartime and the brothers parted company, starting their own trainer-battle.  ‘Adi’ started Adidas and Rudolph opened Puma, building factories on opposite sides of the river in their town of Herzogenaurach.  Apparently they never spoke again, which must have made the family bbq’s tedious.

From the 50s onwards, trainers were not just for athletes, as all the cool kids were wearing them too.  “Sneaks” became all the rage, so named because they allowed you to sneak up on someone.  In the 60s Nike was founded in Portland, Oregon.  A combo of Phil Knight, an athlete, and his coach, Bob Bowerman designed a running shoe which was lightweight and comfortable in various running conditions.  They invented the waffle sole, after pouring rubber into a waffle iron… although a great idea, I can’t imagine his wife was best pleased.  NASA also got in on the trainer act, helping Nike develop the first air cushioned sole.

Jogging in the 70s propelled the design of trainers even further as manufacturers developed their comfort and flexibility and recognised the retail potential.  In the years between 1970 and 2012, models of trainers grew from 5 to 3,371.  These days each sport has it’s own preference and style, and in running is then even further subdivided depending on your gait, preferred terrain and running technique.    

With all this choice and modern technology, how do you get the right shoes for you?  We’d recommend a trip to Simply Sports who can help you navigate the spectrum of running shoes and assess your gait and style.  No need to twist my arm to go trainer shopping!  If your shoes are no longer good for clocking up the miles, but are still wearable, there are lots of charities that collect and send them abroad for those in desperate need.  Run Reigate will have a trainer bank on the race day, if you’d like to donate your old ones, even if they’re still moist!

So, that was a brief run through the history of the humble trainer.  A journey entwined with goddesses, croquet, tents, tanks, waffle irons and NASA naturally!

Running Apps

Are You ‘App’y Now?


In the old days people used to pop their trainers on, limber up and head out for a run they’d mapped out.  Many people, like me, will have accidentally run a few extra miles or have included some accidental fartlek training whilst being lost in a dodgy estate with a group of youths watching on in amusement.  Now we have technology.  Clever apps and watches that can track your route through GPS, telling you how fast, far and high you’ve climbed at each mile and offer you coaching advice whilst you do it. We’ve compiled a list of some running apps on the market and what they can do for you: including building post-apocalyptic communities.

 

New Runner

For those of you who are new to running, there are some great apps that take you from zero to hero.  5K Runner and Couch to 10K, respectively provide 8 and 14 week plans, blending running with walking to help you build up to your first race.  They have integrated Facebook and Twitter communities so you can meet fellow beginners, share your experiences and motivate each other in the first few tough weeks.

In Your Stride is designed to help you prepare for a race.  It creates a training plan based on your current fitness, event distance and target time.  It also adapts as you progress through the plan depending on whether you are exceeding or not meeting your targets.

 

Experienced Runner

If you are looking for state of the art, there are some great options on the market many of which have features such as GPS, speed and elevation tracking, heart rate monitors, time pacing, friend racing, disco options…  

On Nike+ & Nike Coach it’s easy to see your pace variation throughout and it is compatible with various running watches, meaning you don’t need to take a phone out with you, just synchronise when you get home.  

Map My Run and Runtastic are very similar apps as they both owned by Under Armour.  Runtastic is Google Play’s editor’s choice and features a real voice coach whilst running, personal workout diary, custom made dashboard and training plans.

 

Community Focused

Strava, originally for cyclists, is now a favourite of runners too, winning the best app at the 2016 Running Awards.  It’s well known for its community feel, as you can join existing challenges and compare your stats with your friends.  It also has personalised coaching, live performance feedback and detailed analysis post run.

RunKeeper has 45 million users worldwide and all the features you would expect.  It’s intuitive, requiring you to input your goals, whether it be to build fitness/stamina, lose weight or increase your speed.  Renowned running coaches then provide advice on how to achieve these goals.  Links with big brands means potential to win kit too – who doesn’t want a free pair of trainers?  

 

Bored Runner

Zombies, Run!  Am I the only person who had never heard of this app.  Running missions whilst fleeing groaning zombies.  You are always the hero, the faster you run the quieter they become: slow down and you’ll hear them breathing down your neck.  As you run you collect virtual supplies which can then be used at home to build your own post apocalyptic community.  The audio drama feeds in between your own playlist.  That’s a whole new kind of fartlek training.  Imagine the variations you could have: whinging kids, your in-laws, that terrible one-night stand…

If you don’t believe us, check it out here.   You have been warned…

Spotify has introduced a running feature where it reacts to you, matching the speed of your pace to a beat tempo.  Rock My Run also matches your movement to the music it selects for you and has some great playlists to keep you motivated on those longer runs.

So which one are you going to chose to help your Run Reigate half-marathon/10K training?    If you see any of the team sprinting through Reigate High Street screaming that there are zombies chasing them, don’t panic … yet!


  

Simply Sports Socks

Simply Sports – Planning your run, wholesale.


With every running event you get a build up in excitement and the nearer the day of the run the more the nerves are jangling and the greater need to address those last minute details. Do I need new socks, have I got enough Gels, checking what time must I leave for the tenth time! It’s what we all go through as runners every time. It is the same for us at Simply Sports, with every event we get to enjoy our customer’s feelings and it is a great buzz for all the staff.

However, our preparations start over 9 months earlier when we plan and place orders for the following season. Yes it is that far ahead, 2016 is done and dusted and we are now working on 2017!

Even something as simple as socks are ordered well in advance and might involve a meeting in Munich at the Sports Trade fair, trips to London and Birmingham to see various suppliers, we go through the same process of choosing our socks except that the numbers are slightly bigger and we have to travel a bit further. Oh and once we sign on the dotted line there is no changing our mind, we are committed so have to get it right.

As race day nears, whether it is a local Parkrun or the London Marathon we make sure we monitor on a daily basis our stock of the essentials and with the Run Reigate Half marathon and 10K we have even more focus with the race packs. For Run Reigate the excitement is fantastic, we feel every nerve, every twinge that our customers tell us about and the wonderful community spirit that this event creates, our staff love it and always ask months ahead if they can work during the lead up and on the day of the event.

Afterwards, we take stock, are we happy with our performance, did we enjoy it as much as last year and most importantly how did our customers get on. For weeks afterwards we hear tales of the day, the tough bits the atmosphere and then it is on to the next event.  There is nothing like a great local event and Run Reigate is one of the best in the country, officially one of the best!

Then the phone rings and it is Alex Wilson of Hilly Socks asking to book an appointment to go through our sock requirements for 2017! Now where did I leave that crystal ball?


Adrian Pointer – Simply Sports, Reigate

 

Run Reigate Race Start

Your Turn? Advice for entering your first race


After watching Sunday’s London Marathon, did you force your way into your cupboard, past the ironing board, pull your trainers out from under the bike pump and picnic blanket, remove the dead spider, brush away the dust and say to yourself “I’m going to run a marathon next year”.  Watching the London Marathon is so motivational, either as part of the crowds lining the streets, or on the TV, and every year thousands of viewers will be inspired to run the magical route.  Don’t let it just be a dream, if all those ‘normal looking folks’ can do it, so can you.  Here’s some advice to get you started…

IMAG0829

Trainer Time

First of all, those trainers that you dusted off which were popular in the 90s, have probably had their day and you should get yourself a new pair.  There are all manner of highly technical running shoes out there now, which not only look good, but also do useful things such as flexibility in the right places, superior cushioning, traction, gait support and breathability.  It’s well worth a trip to a running shoe specialist, such as Reigate’s Simply Sports, who can provide expert advice on the right trainer for you.

Join the Club

For many people, one of joys of running is the quiet ‘me’ time.  However If you’re serious about running a long distance, but nervous about embarking on this kind of journey on your own, it’s worthwhile finding someone to train with, or better yet, joining a running club.  As well as the coaching, you will find seasoned runners to give you advice on technique and lengthening your runs.  Even if you enjoy the solitude of running, being part of a group once a week, can help with your speed, endurance and motivation on those tough days.  Unlike some of your friends, these people will not drift into a light sleep as you chat about your new glow in the dark kit, or a blow by blow account of your favourite routes.  They love it as much as you do!

Plan of Attack

Whether you’re training for your first 5K or a marathon, you should always have a strategy. It is strangely satisfying, marking off each training run from your plan on the fridge door – even if you’ve actually missed it, but feel that it’s wrong to leave it untouched!  A plan gives you focus, makes sure you train enough, but not too much – and helps you build up the miles at an appropriate speed so that you don’t over do it too early and end up with a jammy ankle.  Runner’s World is a fantastic source for plans, as well as just about any other running question that you might have.

Power Up

As well as a running programme, it’s worthwhile scheduling in some other strength/cross training.  It helps prevent injuries, improve general fitness, recovery and it can be fun to exercise in a different way at times when you’re struggling with your running mojo.  This can come in the form of a fitness class (like British Military Fitness), gym sessions, swimming, cycling, spinning,  etc.  It’s important to look after your core strength, and running alone won’t do that.  Yoga, Pilates or some other form of stretching is also equally important and can really help with the restoration of those tired legs.

Race, Race and Race Again

Running a marathon is a pretty daunting prospect on its own.  However if you start planning in some races over the coming months, you can stop it from seeming such a mammoth goal.  If you’re new to longer distances start with a 10K and move up to half-marathon distances a few months after that.  Reigate Priory Athletic Club have a 10K race in July, which you could then follow with Run Reigate’s Half Marathon on the 18th September.  Regular Saturday Park Runs can help you to monitor your speed progress too.  Runner’s World has a comprehensive race list for the year, from 5K to Ultra (should you be so inspired).

Giving Back

Finally, the odds of getting a ballot place for the London Marathon are slim: but don’t despair.  There are hundreds of places with charities looking for first time runners, as long as you can achieve the sponsorship goal which is usually around the £2,000+ mark.  Charity runners for the Virgin London Marathon have raised over £300 million to date, which is phenomenal.  Apart from supporting a fantastic cause, other benefits of running for a charity include the support they offer, running advice, cheer points, being part of a team, a post-race party with a free sports massage and of course, not to forget the all important t-shirt.  Why not start raising money for one of our charities when you sign up to compete in either our 10K or Half Marathon.

If however, in the coming weeks you decide against running a marathon, it’s still worth entering Run Reigate as we have 2 great challenging distances, a kids race and a fantastic community atmosphere in Priory Park for all the family to enjoy.  Plus you’ll have some lovely new trainers…

 

 

Run Reigate Flags

“I am the Master of my Fate, I am the Captain of my Soul”


What does it take to become a ‘Marathon Man’?  And no, I don’t mean Dustin Hoffman enduring some rogue dentistry.  Just as some of us mere mortals work up to running our first 10K, half or full marathon, Rob Young and Eddie Izzard have completed amazing mental and physical feats that take endurance running to a new elevation, earning themselves the title of Marathon Man.

Extreme races are springing up all over the world, as some runners look for the next level of fortitude.  The legendary Marathon Des Sables started on Friday, in its 28th year and is according to many “The Toughest Race on Earth”.  It’s an ultra, run over 6 days on a course of around 150 miles, in nearly 50C degree heat. The website claims, “Any idiot can run an Ultra marathon, but it takes a special kind of idiot to run the Marathon Des Sables”.  The athletes who run these distances are able to tap into an inner tenacity, that many of us don’t feel we have.

Rob Young had that inner belief.  He also had a very unusual start.  After watching the London Marathon in 2014, his girlfriend bet him 20p that he couldn’t run 26.2 miles.  With an offer like that, what Scot could say no (as a fellow Scot, I am allowed to make that joke).  So Rob got up early the next morning and ran a marathon before work.  He didn’t stop there though – Rob then ran marathons or ultras consecutively for 420 days, covering the same distance as 476 marathons and 11,700 miles in one year.  He won 96 of the races and set some world records on the way.  In January 2015, he set off on a 3,100 mile race across America from LA to Washington DC, which he won by 30 hours, even though in the middle of it he flew back to compete in the London Marathon, an homage to the start of his personal journey.    

Screen Shot 2016-04-11 at 08.35.44

Although Rob had been an athlete when he was young, competing for GB as a triathlete in the 20-24 age group, he hadn’t been running regularly before commencing this amazing feat.  Rob has carried on competing in marathons and ultras.  Studies have shown that his ability to run marathon day after day is extraordinary and that his pain threshold must be very high.  However, athleticism and the ability to tolerate pain do not necessarily make an extreme athlete and he has created purpose from his running that drives him on.  He has raised thousands of pounds for worthy charities that support kids.  He’s a man who clearly believes you are master of your own destiny, deciding to push himself to unparalleled goals and smashing them.    

‘Marathon Men’ don’t have to be athletes.  Eddie Izzard is a hero in our house, ever since my brother introduced me to the ‘Definite Article’ when I was a student.  I know he’s a man of mind over matter.  He has chosen to perform his shows in French, German, Spanish, Russian and Arabic, languages he didn’t even speak, just to challenge himself.  He took this fabulous mindset to endurance running, when in the UK in 2009 and with only 5 weeks training he ran 43 marathons in 51 days, covering 1,100 miles for Sports Relief.  After a foiled attempt in 2012, due to serious medical issues, to run 27 marathons in 27 days in honour of Nelson Mandela’s imprisonment on Robben Island, Eddie came back in 2016 to complete the challenge.  For many people, the weight of such a massive previous disappointment might pull them down, but determinedly he forced his way through, promising to himself and the millions of viewers following him that he would run, walk or crawl his way through the blazing 30C degree heat to complete the challenge and help raise over £2 million for Sports Relief.  In his BBC3 documentary, he reads William Ernest Henley’s ‘Invictus’, a poem that inspired the resilience of Nelson Mandela and clearly at times a mantra for Eddie has he fought his way along mile after mile.  Not a natural athlete, but a man whose mental strength allows him to achieve amazing physical feats.  His great recovery tips of how you can have a beer after a marathon as it has carbohydrates and water in it, show he is a man after my own heart.  Yes, I do love him!

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Being a ‘Marathon Man’ is not about gender.  Let us not forget some of the amazing women who have also been an inspiration to us and no, I’m not talking about myself here.  Apparently women in general are 3 x more likely to complete an ultra than men, not because of fitness, but rather because they are less likely to give up.  Ellie Greenwood is a two-time 100K World Champion and holds course records for a variety of ultra races.   She was the first Britain to win South Africa’s 90 km Comrades Marathon (the oldest ultra-marathon in the world)  in 2014, with a time of 6 hours and 18 minutes.  That’s averaging at 14.3 km per hour in sweltering heat.  We also of course have the wonderful Paula Radcliffe, a marathon legend who retired last year, still holding the women’s world marathon record which she made after just a year of marathon running.  She holds 9 other world records and has asthma!  These ladies have given their all.

When I trained for my first marathon a few years ago, I was dreading my big training runs.  The day I ran 20 miles, it was blowing a gale, snowing with sub-zero conditions.  I had to stop various times (which was the first time that had happened in a training run) and came home with a frozen mono-brow and zero belief that I could run 26.2 miles.  Then the weather turned and I galloped round my next long training run, feeling invincible (clearly this was only in my head and I have no doubt that I was actually shuffling along, being overtaken by sprightly pensioners).  Finishing the race a few weeks later, was without a doubt one of the greatest experiences of my life.  I’m not really a runner, but I had said I was going to do it, people had sponsored me, I was being tracked, pac-man style round the route and I didn’t want to let myself down – so I did it!  I am the Master of my Fate, I am the Captain of my Soul…

These Marathon Men are amazing and so are you.  The first step on any journey is deciding you’re going to do it.  So go on, sign up at www.runreigate.com and we’ll be there to cheer you on every step of the way.

 

Invictus, William Ernest Henley

Out of the night that covers me

Black as the pit from pole to pole,

I thank whatever gods may be

For my unconquerable soul.

 

In the fell clutch of circumstance

I have not winced nor cried aloud.

Under the bludgeonings of chance

My head is bloody, but unbowed.

 

Beyond this place of wrath and tears

Looms but the Horror of the shade,

And yet the menace of the years

Finds and shall find me unafraid.

 

It matters not how strait the gate,

How charged with punishments the scroll,

I am the master of my fate,

I am the captain of my soul.

Kids

Calling All Superheroes – Run Reigate Kids Race


If you are a parent, many of you will have had your kids waiting for you at the finish line of a big race, wildly cheering you on, proudly telling you they will run a half-marathon one day, whilst manhandling your precious sweaty medal to put on their own little neck?  Well, the Run Reigate team believe that budding running dreams could happen sooner rather than later …

We have been toying with the idea of a kids race since our inaugural year, but wanted to do something different that would capture the imagination of the next generation of runners.  An event that all kids, from reception to teenagers, can proudly take part in.  From there, the idea of a kids half-marathon was born: but not just any half-marathon.  Partnering with Reigate & Banstead Council, the Run Reigate Kids Race is part of the R&BeActive initiative to combat childhood obesity, and is sponsored by global camera and printer giant Canon.

We’re challenging kids to accumulate 12 miles by running regularly through their schools in the months leading up to September. Then, on Run Reigate race day (Sunday 18th) they complete the challenge by taking part in the exciting grand finale –  a 1.1 mile race in Priory Park to achieve the 13.1 miles – their very first half-marathon!    

With the help of our digital partners Jellyfish, we have built a dedicated safe website to track all of the amazing miles they run in the build-up to Race Day, along with some suggested mile long training routes around the local area.  If you’re also training for either our 10K or the half-marathon, maybe they can join you for part of one of your weekly sessions, or whilst you’re on holiday, making training a real family affair.  All local schools will be participating in the challenge, so kids can be part of their bigger school team, running with their teachers, inspiring their classmates and in turn being motivated by others.  Apart from the high quality bling, there will also be prizes for the winners in each age category.

If this is all sounds tempting, you might have some questions:

What do I need to do?  

You can register your kids at www.runreigate.com

Is there an age limit?  

Any school child can take place, from age 4 in Reception to age 15 in Year 11!  15 year olds have the option of either running the kids’ half-marathon or in the main 10K event.

Do they have to do the 12 miles in advance?  

Only if they want to.  If they prefer, they can simply join in and run for fun on Race Day

Is my school involved?  

Yes, every school in Reigate & Banstead has been invited to participate, so you should hear about it soon from them.

What time is it?  

There will be 5 kids races split into class year groups:

  • 12.00 – Years 11, 10 & 9
  • 12.10 – Years 8 & 7
  • 12.20 – Years 6, 5 & 4
  • 12.35 – Years 3 & 2
  • 12.50 – Year 1 & Reception.

How many places are there?  

As this event will be popular, we are limiting the 2016 race to 2,000 places in total.

How much does it cost?  

£12, which covers the cost of running the event, a technical race t-shirt and an amazing medal – the same one as the adult half-marathon and 10K runners will receive!  It’ll stop them from nabbing yours.

Can they run for charity?  

Yes!  We will provide entrants with a sponsorship form where they can raise money (e.g. £1 per mile) and run for a charity of their choosing or one of ours.

What else will there be for kids to do?  

There will be a host of FREE fun activities for kids of all ages in the Move Revolution Kids Active Zone (last year we hosted over 1,500 kids who didn’t want to leave!).  There will also be live music, ice-cream, gourmet burgers, fresh pizza and smoothies in the Food Festival.

What about parking?  

We’ll have hundreds of parking spaces within a 5 minute walk of Priory Park.

Loos?  

Don’t worry….there are loads (and loads) of loos in the park.

Run Reigate has become a fantastic community focused event in Priory Park with an amazing atmosphere and a great day out for the whole family!   The addition of the Kids Race will make it even bigger and better and we’d love to have you and your children there, helping us make history as the UK’s first kids half-marathon.  

If you would like to enter the Kids Race, 10K or Half-Marathon, please register at www.runreigate.com.  Any questions, that are not covered online, please feel free to get in touch at karen.hanmore@runreigate.co.uk

10986690

Join the fancy-dress parade!


Jonathan Pyle (Founder of The Purple Teapot Puppet Company) – talks to the Run Reigate team about dressing up for race day and why fancy dress is the way forward!

This will be my third Reigate Half Marathon for the Children’s Trust. Two years ago I ran to test my own level of fitness, impress my wife and children and at the same time raise some money for a very worthy cause. Last year ,however, I decided to do something a bit different, in an effort to increase the amount of sponsorship money I raised.

 As a result of reaching my target last year, I ran the half marathon in a horse costume. (Usually you inflate them but I filled mine up with cushions and material I found lying around the house as inflating it wasn’t an option !)

What I could never have anticipated, however, was the joy and fun it brought to all those children (and grown-ups) who came out to support us as we ran through their villages and past their houses giving us the vital support, encouragement and jelly babies we needed to keep us going. I could see children far in the distance pointing to ‘the funny man on a donkey’ and as I ran past ‘attempt’ to go into a trot. Not only that, but the encouragement from other runners and stewards on the day was one of the most heart-warming experiences I have ever had.

This year I will be running the half marathon in a different ‘costume.’ Again I will look silly and it may knock around 20 minutes off my personal best but it will be worth it to give something back to all those children (and grown-ups) who cheered me, and you, on last year. It would be wonderful to see more people ‘dress up’ for this year’s half marathon and put a smile on the faces of those that support us, irrespective of the charity you run are running for, maybe even raising more money in the process.

Jonathan Pyle (Founder of The Purple Teapot Puppet Company) 

http://purpleteapot.co.uk