Running man illustration

Advice on Shin Splints from Parkview Clinic


Run Reigate are delighted that Parkview Clinic in Reigate are joining us at this year’s event.  Check out their blog on Shin Splints and how their clinic can help if you’re suffering…

Parview

Shin Splints, also known as Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome is a condition commonly suffered by long distance runners and affects the front of the lower leg. It will often begin as a dull ache along the shin bone, but can build up to be quite an acute pain that will stop you exercising.

There are a number of reasons Shin Splints can happen, however, you are most at risk due to the following factors:

  • You’ve recently taken up running or increased your distance
  • You run on hard surfaces
  • You’re carrying too much weight
  • Poor fitting running shoes
  • Your feet roll inwards
  • The muscles of your lower leg are too tight

The pain is caused by inflammation to the connective tissue that joins your muscles to the bone. If you feel these symptoms it is vital that you do not run through the pain as this will only make it worse and keep you of sport for a longer time. A minimum of 2 weeks rest, ice and anti-inflammatory work is advised. However, if you have not addressed the reason it has come on then it may repeat once you start running again.

A quick accurate diagnosis is important to confirm that it is Shin Splints and not other conditions such as Compartment Syndrome, Radiculopathy, Stress Fractures or Muscle tear.

An early visit to a physiotherapist is the best solution  to confirm this and assess the reasons behind the pain. Physios will look at the angles of your feet, the integrity of the foot arch, the bio-mechanical chains between your feet, knees and hips and examine your stride pattern during running.

As mentioned, rest is vital, but calming down the inflammation and muscle tension can be sped up by using treatment techniques such as Ultrasound, Acupuncture, Facia release, Massage and exercise rehab. You may also be advised on changing footwear or using Orthotics and importantly making sure your running technique is correct.

Often through a desire for speed and exhaustion runners will over-reach in their stride pattern creating a more acute impact angle when the foot hits the ground, usually with the knee locked out in extension, thus reducing shock absorbance. This exaggerated impact that sends a force through the shin bone is a common reason for Shin Splints to begin. Don’t worry though, changing your running pattern doesn’t mean slower times as your “Cadence” or strides per minute can easily be maintained!

If you are concerned about such pain and it is affecting your training routine for the forthcoming Run Reigate event then please do give the team at Parkview Clinic Reigate a call and come down for an expert assessment. You’ll be pleased to know they are currently offering all entrants 10% off treatments up to the 18th September!

Visit: www.parkviewclinic.co.uk 01737 247555

 

Sweethaven Computers

5 Ways Wearable Tech Can Enhance Your Workout


Run Reigate is delighted that Sweethaven have joined us as a new partner this year.  Check out their blog on wearable tech – including your chance to win a FREE Pulsense wristband.

Sweethaven Computers (1)

Technology is fast becoming an integral part of people’s fitness plans. Wearable fitness tech is constantly advancing to improve the quality of our training and results, enabling us to better create and meet both short-term and long-term fitness goals.

With so many features now available via wearable tech, which are the most useful for enhancing your workout? The technology team at Sweethaven has a few top tips…

Track Your Heart Rate

Of course your heart rate is going to go up during exercise! What many people don’t know is that heart rate can also be used to monitor dehydration; the symptoms of which are often overlooked by athletes during exercise. The wireless sensor tracking of heart rate can therefore be used to help you track when you need to be taking that extra sip of water.

Sleep Tracking

Tough workouts require solid sleep for muscle recovery! Use your wearable tech to track the number of hours and quality of sleep you’re getting to help make sure you’re giving your body the best opportunity for regeneration.

Target Tracker

All athletes know that progress is about goals. Use your wearable tech to set your targets and then track your progress towards achievement for positive reinforcement. Determine your daily goal and then see what your average result against it is. You can adjust your daily targets accordingly, just be sure that your goal positively impacts your fitness level – and that, over time, you see progress.

For the more competitive ones amongst us, buddy up with a training partner with similar goals to track who reaches their goal the quickest!

Calorie Counting

Because what’s more motivational than visibly eating away at the calories gained from that last pack of biscuits!

Discover all the Apps

With a whole world of apps now available, there will be a host of apps capable of accompanying and complimenting your wearable tech tracking. Apps for monitoring food intake, for example, can be a particularly beneficial when used alongside your fitness tracking to ensure you’re fuelling your body correctly. There are also apps out there that allow you to connect with online communities of fellow fitness enthusiasts for even more support and encouragement.

Sweethaven is proud to be supporting the Run Reigate half marathon this September. To celebrate this important calendar date, we’ll be giving away one FREE Pulsense wristband to one lucky runner. To be in with a chance of winning, enter your details via our website: http://www.sweethaven.co.uk/run-reigate

Sweethaven Computers

DKH_2016

Dame Kelly Holmes at Run Reigate


Last week’s blog was all about inspiration.  As our thoughts turn to the Olympics,  there are few more inspirational runners than Dame Kelly Holmes…

Dame Kelly Holmes is a legend in many ways.  Winner of gold in the 800m and 1500m distances at the 2004 Athens Olympics and she is still the holder of the 600m, 800m and 1,000m British records.  She has been an inspiration for thousands of young people to take up middle distance running.  Dame Kelly also spent 6 years as the President of the English Commonwealth Games.  She is a great supporter of charitable work and has set up her own, the Dame Kelly Holmes Trust – more about this later.

Helping to Make Run Reigate Even More Special

It will be amazing to have Dame Kelly with us on the big day and we’ll be keeping her really busy!  Ranging from starting our races, awarding prizes to the winners and handing medals out to some of the kids in their events.  If at any point you see her jogging between roles, please do not take this as an opportunity to race her.  It will be embarrassing for everyone concerned, especially when she beats you…

Dame Kelly Holmes

Your Chance to Meet Dame Kelly Holmes

Yes, you can have the chance to meet her in person!  Dame Kelly Holmes will be hosting an exclusive Race Reception with 30 winners.  The raffle is open to all registered runners, you just have to buy a £3 ticket to be entered into the draw.

The “VIP Race Reception”:

  • Only open to the 30 winners of the raffle
  • You will hear exclusive background and tips from this Olympic legend
  • Be hosted in a VIP tented marquee
  • Ask questions and get photos with a national running hero
  • Get your Run Reigate exclusive finishers t-shirt signed
  • Drinks and light refreshments also provided

Tickets are £3 each or 4 for £10

To sign up for the raffle you must be registered for this year’s event, then enter at https://register.canbook.me/e/shop/10199.   If you haven’t signed up yet, you can buy tickets when you book your place online.  Entries close 11.59pm on Sunday 4th September and winners will be notified within 24 hours.  You can enter as many times as you like (no one will judge you for stalking).

Kelly’s Heroes

All proceeds, and we’re hoping to raise a great deal of raffle prize money, will be given directly to Dame Kelly’s charities, for whom she is hoping to raise a staggering £250,000 this year.  These are all organisations that are close to her heart which she calls Kelly’s heroes because of the time and care they give to people in need.  For more information about each of the charities, including her own Trust, which supports disadvantaged young people, please click on the links below:

The Dame Kelly Holmes Trust

Mind UK

Myeloma

Hospice in the Weald

Pickering Cancer Care Charity

Run Reigate are delighted to be able to support all of these community charities and would greatly appreciate it if you could dig deep in your pockets to support them too.  However if you’re not one of the lucky winners, don’t worry, you’ll have plenty of opportunity to see her around and about at the event.

We’re more excited than ever about the big day now and we hope you are too!  If you haven’t entered either the 10K or half-marathon don’t worry, there’s still time to sign-up and join in the fun.  2016 is going to be Run Reigate’s best event yet!

 

St Catherine's Hospice Runner

St. Catherine’s Hospice – Charity Partner


Many people think a hospice is a place where people spend their final moments, but at St Catherine’s Hospice the focus is on helping people make the most of the time they have left.

The local hospice encourages patients to live well and recognises that people are more than their illness; it’s not their diagnosis, but their individual wishes and needs that matter most to the people at St Catherine’s.

Committed to providing the local community with the best possible end of life care, the local hospice has been providing free, expert care to people across Sussex and Surrey for the last 30 years. Last year, more than 2,000 patients were cared for at the hospice and in the comfort of their own homes, including 175 patients from Reigate*.

As well as tailored practical care, St Catherine’s also offers people: emotional support, welfare advice, spiritual care, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, complementary therapies and creative activities such as music and art. The hospice recognises that, at such a challenging time, emotional support is just as important as the physical care they provide, and are also there to offer support and advice to families, friends and carers.

Although their services are free, each day it costs St Catherine’s more than £17,000 to provide their care. Receiving less than a third of their running costs from the NHS, for the rest, the hospice relies on the generosity and support of the local community. By supporting Run Reigate, you’re helping ensure St Catherine’s can be there for people in future, when and where they are needed most – there can be no better motivation to run.

If you would like to find out more about how you can help support St Catherine’s, please visit:

www.stch.org.uk or call 01293 447361.

*Town figures from 2014/2015

One of our runners…

Joelle is just one runner taking part in Run Reigate and raising money for St Catherine’s Hospice.  Joelle was kind enough to give her thoughts about running for St Catherine’s this year.

“I ran last year and although it was tough I really enjoyed the atmosphere and the satisfaction of running my first half marathon. I knew a couple of my friends, (Kate and Romy) were keen and so once I saw we could run for St Catherine’s, the decision was made.  We all agreed it was a great reason to sign up!

I work at Reigate Manor and St Catherine’s is our chosen charity because it does wonderful things for people in our local community, we’ve also got our General and Assistant Managers to sign up to take part.

We each have a target of £250 but would ideally like to raise more.  We will have a JustGiving page which we will put all over Facebook and Twitter and just generally pester our friends and families to give as generously as they can!

Training is the hardest part, between us we have six children aged two to six and are juggling work and various other commitments.  We have to try and run in the evenings and weekends but we all have different schedules so we just get out for a run whenever we can.

It’s much more fun running together!

Running 13.1 miles and raising money for such a worthy charity gives you the biggest sense of achievement.  If you’re thinking about doing it in future years, just do it!”

 

If you would like to raise money for St. Catherine’s Hospice whilst running this year’s Run Reigate, please get in touch.

Kids

Inspiring Kids to Become Regular Runners


It takes time, effort, inspiration and love – along with a healthy dose of patience and humour to look after our children these days.  With so many more distractions to keep them indoors, what does it take to get them active (….that doesn’t involve hunting Pokemon down in the streets of Reigate)?  Karen Hanmore is our wildly energetic and ever-enthusiastic Run Reigate Kids Race Manager.  We want to share some of her journey during the last few months.

Since our first year there has been great demand for us to introduce a kids race and I can see why.  In our family it’s not going to be long till my 9 year old daughter can take me in a sprint race … I’m going to have to up my game or ask for a head start.

It took nearly 3 months to pin down exactly what kind of kids race Run Reigate would be.  Not just any old kids run, but rather something very different – something which would embody them being active and spur them on to regular running, whilst having lots of fun.  We thought about the event we’re best known for, the half-marathon, and from there the seeds were planted and the idea of a kids cumulative version grew.  So 12 miles needed to be completed bit by bit, week in week out between Easter and September, with the grand finale 1.1 miles on race day.

Putting this particular race together has been a big job for the team as a whole, but in particular for Karen.  We were fortunate that camera and printer giant Canon (headquartered in Reigate) shared our vision and got involved from the onset to sponsor the event.   This has helped us resource it and to give the whipper snappers all the good stuff the grown-ups receive.

The next big job was to try to get all the local schools involved and, with 58 of them across Reigate & Banstead, that was always no mean feat.  They’ve all been wonderful and keen to engage with us – to date Karen (sometimes with Dave our Race Director) has presented at 25 assemblies throughout the borough, battling through armies of excited youngsters and ensuring that each and every child knew they were warmly encouraged to take part.   The Run Reigate team appreciates just how many schools have embraced the challenge, facilitating running sessions during term time and all the support for the idea we have received.  As we write this, there are now children registered from over 150 schools, some as far away as London and Brighton.

Kids Race

Run Reigate at Dunnottar School

Some schools, such as Lime Tree in Merstham, have gone above and beyond, sponsoring 16 of their children to take part and having a sign up rate of over 50% of the whole school!   As Karen’s own children attend the school, she was inspired to start a running club there to encourage the pupils to see how much fun running can be.  Every morning they meet, warm up and enjoy a variety of games including tag, relays, pyramids as well as timed laps so they can see their progression.  It’s not competitive so that everyone feels they have a place.

Back to the event.  The kids race will have it’s own start gantry in the park with a 1.1 mile route that joins up onto the tree-lined adults infrastructure, concluding at the finish in front of Priory School and thousands of spectators including all the adults fresh in from the Half Marathon and 10k.  Here in a closed, controlled area, they will be awarded their full half-marathon medal – same as the adults, along with their high quality technical t-shirt, banana, water and kids goody bag. Parents – no nabbing those medals for yourselves now!

One of the most inspiring outcomes for us have been the amazing kids we’ve met along the way, many of whom Karen now regularly bumps into around town.  One little girl even joined her this week whilst she was running laps of Priory lake to keep her company!

We’re delighted that so many families and schools have been keen to take part this year.  Places have gone really quickly and it looks as though we will sell out prior to the event which is very exciting.  If you haven’t booked your kids place already, you might want to soon.  We hope all the kids have a fantastic summer holiday and please keep them running just for fun.

Don’t forget you can track the miles your kids run on our website – any questions, just drop us a line through the contact page.

The reaction to our first kids cumulative half marathon been inspiring, as has the reaction of schools, teachers, parents, sponsors and kids.  In this wonderful Olympic year, sporting inspiration shouldn’t be hard to come by, but maybe some of it will be closer to home than you think.

 

Dave Kelly & Daren Elliott

DAREN ELLIOTT – RUNNING COACH & BRIGHTON MARATHON PACER


Run Reigate is well and truly up and running!

Well I have spent the morning with David Kelly the Race Director of the Reigate Half Marathon, 10K and New Kids Race.

With 8am on a Wednesday morning in July planned for our meeting in Reigate’s Priory Park I jog over to our meeting place and shake the hand of the person I have arranged to meet, smiles all round.

About me, well nothing out of the ordinary really. I have been a runner for many years, I have coached athletics and running with my local Athletics club, tried my hand at pace making over half Marathon and Marathon distance and am an Ambassador with the Brighton based Run Brighton Group.

So the meeting was about the purposed route change or tweak of the hilly section in the last couple of miles of the Reigate Half Marathon, the hilly section in question had received a bit of negative feedback and when brought to David’s attention to his credit he set out to do something about this.

How is it that you can run with a person you have just met and you can feel totally at ease, the conversation flows and the miles slip by, yet stand in a lift or on a train and there is complete silence.

Well, David introduced me to the Reigate 10k course which has a cracking first fast section and ample room to stretch your legs if you’re looking for a fast time, then we had reached the tweaked and improved section of the Reigate Half, yes it’s still a hill but nowhere near the incline from last September. In fact it was a very nice and shady climb not too heavy on the legs or lungs at all.

Within no time at all we were at the top of the now “not so hilly section” and were turning the corner to the side entrance of the Majestic Priory Park, this is where it all happens, this is when you know you have almost completed a half marathon because on the day you will be greeted by hundreds of cheering people all urging you on the last few balloon and ticker tape filled yards to the finish line.

Well we talked and ran, David told me about a fantastic new children’s race which is also taking place and will help to get kids fit and have fun…………Yes I had a very pleasant morning starting out running with a stranger and finishing with a friend.

Daren Elliott, Husband, Father, Runner…………in that order!

Half Marathon Route

Run Reigate’s Half Marathon & 10K Routes


The Run Reigate team are delighted to confirm some small improvements and adjustments to the half marathon and 10K routes this year.  Only the latter part of the 2016 route is changing, mainly due to the extensive feedback we received last year from our runners and to a request we received from Surrey County Council in the wake of a planned rebuild of Flanchford Bridge this summer.  You may be wondering why we’re only releasing this now, however it takes a great deal of time to plan, agree and implement route changes with all the various parties and stakeholders involved.  That said, we hope you’ll be really pleased with the changes we’ve made and that this year’s races will be even better than ever!

Both races will again be held on fully closed roads all the way, incorporating beautiful country lanes and rural countryside, with fantastic and ever-enthusiastic community support all along the route.

Half Marathon

Both the half marathon and 10K races will once again start in a blaze of glory in front of the Priory School in Priory Park.  After leaving Priory Park through the Bell Street car park, runners will turn right onto Bell Street proceeding up Cockshot Hill and down the lovely fast incline into Woodhatch*.  At this point, the races part company with the half marathon turning left onto Lonesome Lane – a long, flat and very scenic route meandering wistfully to the south and eventually joining Meath Green Lane towards Horley.

In Horley, the route turns right onto Grove Road where you’ll hear the wonderful residents before seeing them, and leading into Hurst Road before proceeding right along Lee Street and Mill Lane towards the Black Horse Pub, a well-known local watering hole.   We then turn left onto Reigate Road heading south towards Gatwick before making a u-turn and turning back up to head north back up towards Reigate. Runners will again follow the unusually quiet and very scenic A217 all the way back into Reigate (about 4 miles) until they reach the Beehive Pub, where as we did last year, you turn left onto the residential and friendly Sandcross Lane.

It is at this point that the route deviates from 2015.  This year, runners will continue further up Sandcross Lane past Reigate Garden Centre before turning sharp left into the very pretty Whitehall Lane.  This new part of the route is very rural and on a nice gradual downward incline, before a right turn onto Slipshatch Road.  Rather than going up towards Flanchford Road (and  Littleton Manor Equestrian Centre) as we did last year, we turn right onto Clayhill Lane and then right onto a small loop comprising New North Road, Sandcross Lane and Park Lane East, before right onto Park Lane again towards the finish.  As is inescapable for Reigate, this last mile involves a short sharp incline – (aka a HILL…) however it’s fully surfaced and generally regarded by many runners as being much kinder than last year’s Bosh Hill.  We’re not going to lie – it’s there, some will find it hard but it is short and sharp and you’ll be over it before you know it.   What goes us MUST come down and runners are rewarded with a nice recovery decline before turning right and back into majestic Priory Park.   Follow the flags and the thousands of cheering people along the tree lined path to finish in front of the of the stage and the Priory where you started just a short time ago!

Run Reigate Half Marathon Route 2016

10K*

In Woodhatch, 10K runners will continue heading south along Dovers Green Road before making a u-turn shortly after Hartswood Sports Ground which will then re-join the main course in a northerly direction to create the required distance.  

Further information about the routes and the topography will be published on www.runreigate.com however if you have any questions, please feel free to get in touch with the team.  We will be delighted to answer any questions you may have.

Run Reigate 10k Route 2016

                      

Running to great beats!

Running – The Beat Goes On…


You’re running laps round Priory Park lake as part of your interval training.   The last couple of sprints have worn you out and your legs have no more to give.  But wait, the intro to Queen’s ‘Don’t Stop Me Now’ starts on your phone and you’re off, running like you’ve never run before (apart from the last time it came on) and you’ve cut 2 seconds off your PB – job done!

Training whilst listening to headphones is a contentious issue in the running community, polarising people in parks, tracks and towpaths up and down the country.  Apparently there are two types of runners, those who are “associators” who like to have inward focus when running and “dissociators” who need to focus outwards and be distracted by what how they might be feeling.  Let’s have a look at both sides of the debate:

FOR – The Budmeisters

Runners, especially those who are new to long distance, find music to be an excellent distraction when they are a few miles in and feeling weary.  

Studies have shown that external stimuli can block out fatigue, increase your concentration and leave you feeling positive.  

It can be particularly useful in fartlek/interval training, with pumping songs helping you to keep the short sprint sessions going.  

For those training for longer races on their own, it can also be nice company when you’re out for 2 hours on a Sunday morning, pounding the Surrey streets.

AGAINST – El Silencios

Many purists believe that you are better able to listen to your breathing and be attuned to your body and rhythm, when not distracted by music.  

One of the joys of running can also be that chance to clear your thoughts and empty your mind of the day’s issues, returning home in a much more peaceful state of mind.  

At times music can result in you running too fast – think Michael Jackson’s ‘Don’t Stop Till You Get Enough’ (or pass out) versus too slow such as Adele’s ‘Make You Feel My Love’ (running and crying don’t mix).  

You can also enjoy the beautiful nature that we have in Reigate, birds singing, squirrels leaping, leaves crunching and passers by shouting out warnings of dog poo ahead.   

IN-BETWEENERS

There are some runners who straddle these stereotypes choosing to have just one ear phone in, so they can listen to music and the outside world.  I personally am not able to multi-task in such a way and those people will only receive half of the wonder that is Kylie and Jason’s ‘Especially for You’.

Each to their own I say!  As long as you’re safe, watch out for small children and zombies …

SiS Runner

Run Reigate – The SiS Guide to Training


As well as producing some of the Run Reigate team’s favourite gels and recovery drinks, Science in Sport (SiS) also provide a wealth of training and nutrition advice which we’re really happy to share with you.  There are a variety of factors which can make the difference between you making it to the start line of your first half-marathon or 10K, or not!  First up is the most important element in any race preparation – training.  

RUN

There are three golden rules you should adhere to, to ensure you give yourself the best chance of starting, finishing and achieving your running dream:

R – Rest and recovery

These are two of the most underrated aspects of training.  DO NOT forget to rest and recover after hard-training.

U – Understand your limits

When it comes to endurance running, there are many things which are beyond your control.  Your “genetic potential” being one of them.

N – Never run on an injury

As tempting as it might be to try and ignore a muscle or tendon niggle, you are likely to make it far worse by running on it.

Training Intensity

Knowing how hard to push yourself is one of the hardest things to do when training for a race.  Your weekly training regime is a tricky balance between slow/steady sessions to build endurance and higher intensity sessions to increase your resistance to fatigue and increase your threshold.  

The question is how hard should you push?

Too Easy

Although slow and steady sessions are an important part of training, if performed too frequently, low intensity sessions can lead to a training plateau.

Too Hard

If you push yourself too hard, either by running too fast, too often or too far, then you are at risk of overloading your body and over stressing it – resulting in injury.

So, how do you gauge what intensity you should train at?

A heart rate monitor is an excellent way to ensure you are training at the right intensity.  If you don’t own one or need a guide, then check out the table below to get familiar with your “rate of perceived exertion”.

Rate of Perceived Exertion

R.P.E SCALE HOW YOU FEEL % HR MAX
1 Chilling, sitting down, feet up watching a movie 30-40%
2 A walk to the shops to get more popcorn 45-55%
3 A light jog 60-70%
4 A sociable pace, quicker than a job but able to chat 70-75%
5 Comfortable.  Got a good sweat on and you feel great 75-80%
6 Comfortable-ish.  You feel like it’s a good paced run 80-85%
7 Talking getting difficult.  Possible – but not very easy 85-90%
8 Only short answers to important questions possible 90-95%
9 Talking all but impossible 95% +
10 Talking is impossible.  You can only keep this intensity up for 10-15 seconds N/A

Approximate method to work out HRmax – true HRmax vary significantly from runner to runner.

Steady Paced Run (R.P.E. 3-5 or 70-80% HRmax)

A steady pace is just that – a pace which you can maintain for a long time  Steady paced runs will form a large part of your training.  This is the pace you should stick to for all your long weekend runs, as well as a good chunk of your mid-week runs too.  It helps build endurance and encourages the nervous and muscular systems to tolerate long distance running.

As you get fitter, you’ll find that not only will your “steady pace” get faster, but you’ll also be able to maintain that pace for longer without fatigue.

Tempo Paced Run (RPE 5-7 or 80-85% HRmax)

A tempo run is a pace which is a notch or two quicker than a steady pace.  At this intensity, talking is just about possible but you should only be able to manage “short-ish” sentences before need to take a breath.  

Beginners may initially find that a one or two mile tempo run is tough but a conditioned runner may be able to maintain tempo pace for a good eight miles and beyond.  Tempo session are excellent at increasing your tolerance to fatigue and should feature at least once a week in your training schedule.

Fartlek (RPE 6-8 or 85-90+% HRmax)

Fartlek is brilliant training but often underused by marathon runners.  It is based on a steady paced run but interspersed with periods of faster running at random times of your choice.  Vary the distance/time of the fast paced sections of these sessions to mix up the training stimulus and keep you interested.  Suggested times for fast sections can vary from 30 secs at RPE 8-9 to 5 mins at RPE 6-8.

Intervals (RPE 7-9 or 85+% HRmax)

Intervals are very similar to fartlek training. The key difference between them is that they are far more structured.  Interval sessions are excellent at increasing your threshold, thereby teaching the body to tolerate running at faster speeds.

E.g.

Distance/Time No. of intervals Rest between RPE % Max HR
1 mile 3-5 5-3 mins 6-8 80-90
5 minutes 4-8 1 min 6-7 80-90
800 meters 6-8 3-2 mins 7-8 85-95

As fitness improves – increase intervals, reduce rest time.  RPE will increase towards end of session.

By incorporating all of these training runs into your weekly regime you should be fully prepared for the Run Reigate Half-Marathon or 10K on Sunday 18th September.  To view the full SiS guide, please see http://www.scienceinsport.com/marathon-training-guide.

Good luck with your training!

 

History of the trainer

The Humble Trainer


The humble trainer – where would we runners be without it?  Much to the delight of Run Reigate’s founder Dave Kelly, one of the earliest recordings of organised running dates back to 1829 BC, the Tailteann Games, a sporting festival in Ireland in honour of Tailtiu, the goddess of butter … kidding.  These runners would probably only have had leather or animal strips covering their feet, if anything at all.  Today’s runners have an extensive choice of trainer, depending on their gait, ability and terrain preference.  Here’s more than you’ve ever probably wanted to know about the humble trainer…

Trainers that we know today were originally a British invention (of course), developed in  1832 by a chap called Wait Webster, who designed a process where rubber soles could be attached to leather shoes and boots.  By 1852 the plimsoll was born, widely worn by children.  The term plimsoll comes from the elastic band that joins the upper sole and resembles a “plimsoll line” on a ship’s hull.  Soon croquet and tennis players got in on the act and special soles were designed to provide more grip.  I’ve often had terrible slippage problems whilst playing croquet.  Then another Brit, Joseph William Foster (owner of Boulton which later became Reebok), added spikes to the bottom of the plimmies to make what we now know as running spikes.  

Next up came vulcanisation, a revolution in shoe manufacturing that had nothing to with Spock.  Vulcanisation is the process of melting rubber and fabric together, a mixture that then evolved to create treads and the start of the trainer as we know it – lightweight and flexible.  Goodyear, of tyre fame, started producing these shoes then known as ‘Keds’, in 1892, but it wasn’t until 1917 that they moved into the running field.  

Rudolf and Adolf ‘Adi’ Dassler from Germany started making their own shoes in their mother’s wash kitchen, after returning from the First World War and by the Second World War they were selling 200,000 pairs of shoes a year.  Post war they actually used surplus tent canvas and fuel tank rubber – now that’s what we call recycling!  As successful as they were, relationships turned sour during wartime and the brothers parted company, starting their own trainer-battle.  ‘Adi’ started Adidas and Rudolph opened Puma, building factories on opposite sides of the river in their town of Herzogenaurach.  Apparently they never spoke again, which must have made the family bbq’s tedious.

From the 50s onwards, trainers were not just for athletes, as all the cool kids were wearing them too.  “Sneaks” became all the rage, so named because they allowed you to sneak up on someone.  In the 60s Nike was founded in Portland, Oregon.  A combo of Phil Knight, an athlete, and his coach, Bob Bowerman designed a running shoe which was lightweight and comfortable in various running conditions.  They invented the waffle sole, after pouring rubber into a waffle iron… although a great idea, I can’t imagine his wife was best pleased.  NASA also got in on the trainer act, helping Nike develop the first air cushioned sole.

Jogging in the 70s propelled the design of trainers even further as manufacturers developed their comfort and flexibility and recognised the retail potential.  In the years between 1970 and 2012, models of trainers grew from 5 to 3,371.  These days each sport has it’s own preference and style, and in running is then even further subdivided depending on your gait, preferred terrain and running technique.    

With all this choice and modern technology, how do you get the right shoes for you?  We’d recommend a trip to Simply Sports who can help you navigate the spectrum of running shoes and assess your gait and style.  No need to twist my arm to go trainer shopping!  If your shoes are no longer good for clocking up the miles, but are still wearable, there are lots of charities that collect and send them abroad for those in desperate need.  Run Reigate will have a trainer bank on the race day, if you’d like to donate your old ones, even if they’re still moist!

So, that was a brief run through the history of the humble trainer.  A journey entwined with goddesses, croquet, tents, tanks, waffle irons and NASA naturally!