Running to great beats!

Running – The Beat Goes On…


You’re running laps round Priory Park lake as part of your interval training.   The last couple of sprints have worn you out and your legs have no more to give.  But wait, the intro to Queen’s ‘Don’t Stop Me Now’ starts on your phone and you’re off, running like you’ve never run before (apart from the last time it came on) and you’ve cut 2 seconds off your PB – job done!

Training whilst listening to headphones is a contentious issue in the running community, polarising people in parks, tracks and towpaths up and down the country.  Apparently there are two types of runners, those who are “associators” who like to have inward focus when running and “dissociators” who need to focus outwards and be distracted by what how they might be feeling.  Let’s have a look at both sides of the debate:

FOR – The Budmeisters

Runners, especially those who are new to long distance, find music to be an excellent distraction when they are a few miles in and feeling weary.  

Studies have shown that external stimuli can block out fatigue, increase your concentration and leave you feeling positive.  

It can be particularly useful in fartlek/interval training, with pumping songs helping you to keep the short sprint sessions going.  

For those training for longer races on their own, it can also be nice company when you’re out for 2 hours on a Sunday morning, pounding the Surrey streets.

AGAINST – El Silencios

Many purists believe that you are better able to listen to your breathing and be attuned to your body and rhythm, when not distracted by music.  

One of the joys of running can also be that chance to clear your thoughts and empty your mind of the day’s issues, returning home in a much more peaceful state of mind.  

At times music can result in you running too fast – think Michael Jackson’s ‘Don’t Stop Till You Get Enough’ (or pass out) versus too slow such as Adele’s ‘Make You Feel My Love’ (running and crying don’t mix).  

You can also enjoy the beautiful nature that we have in Reigate, birds singing, squirrels leaping, leaves crunching and passers by shouting out warnings of dog poo ahead.   

IN-BETWEENERS

There are some runners who straddle these stereotypes choosing to have just one ear phone in, so they can listen to music and the outside world.  I personally am not able to multi-task in such a way and those people will only receive half of the wonder that is Kylie and Jason’s ‘Especially for You’.

Each to their own I say!  As long as you’re safe, watch out for small children and zombies …

SiS Runner

Run Reigate – The SiS Guide to Training


As well as producing some of the Run Reigate team’s favourite gels and recovery drinks, Science in Sport (SiS) also provide a wealth of training and nutrition advice which we’re really happy to share with you.  There are a variety of factors which can make the difference between you making it to the start line of your first half-marathon or 10K, or not!  First up is the most important element in any race preparation – training.  

RUN

There are three golden rules you should adhere to, to ensure you give yourself the best chance of starting, finishing and achieving your running dream:

R – Rest and recovery

These are two of the most underrated aspects of training.  DO NOT forget to rest and recover after hard-training.

U – Understand your limits

When it comes to endurance running, there are many things which are beyond your control.  Your “genetic potential” being one of them.

N – Never run on an injury

As tempting as it might be to try and ignore a muscle or tendon niggle, you are likely to make it far worse by running on it.

Training Intensity

Knowing how hard to push yourself is one of the hardest things to do when training for a race.  Your weekly training regime is a tricky balance between slow/steady sessions to build endurance and higher intensity sessions to increase your resistance to fatigue and increase your threshold.  

The question is how hard should you push?

Too Easy

Although slow and steady sessions are an important part of training, if performed too frequently, low intensity sessions can lead to a training plateau.

Too Hard

If you push yourself too hard, either by running too fast, too often or too far, then you are at risk of overloading your body and over stressing it – resulting in injury.

So, how do you gauge what intensity you should train at?

A heart rate monitor is an excellent way to ensure you are training at the right intensity.  If you don’t own one or need a guide, then check out the table below to get familiar with your “rate of perceived exertion”.

Rate of Perceived Exertion

R.P.E SCALE HOW YOU FEEL % HR MAX
1 Chilling, sitting down, feet up watching a movie 30-40%
2 A walk to the shops to get more popcorn 45-55%
3 A light jog 60-70%
4 A sociable pace, quicker than a job but able to chat 70-75%
5 Comfortable.  Got a good sweat on and you feel great 75-80%
6 Comfortable-ish.  You feel like it’s a good paced run 80-85%
7 Talking getting difficult.  Possible – but not very easy 85-90%
8 Only short answers to important questions possible 90-95%
9 Talking all but impossible 95% +
10 Talking is impossible.  You can only keep this intensity up for 10-15 seconds N/A

Approximate method to work out HRmax – true HRmax vary significantly from runner to runner.

Steady Paced Run (R.P.E. 3-5 or 70-80% HRmax)

A steady pace is just that – a pace which you can maintain for a long time  Steady paced runs will form a large part of your training.  This is the pace you should stick to for all your long weekend runs, as well as a good chunk of your mid-week runs too.  It helps build endurance and encourages the nervous and muscular systems to tolerate long distance running.

As you get fitter, you’ll find that not only will your “steady pace” get faster, but you’ll also be able to maintain that pace for longer without fatigue.

Tempo Paced Run (RPE 5-7 or 80-85% HRmax)

A tempo run is a pace which is a notch or two quicker than a steady pace.  At this intensity, talking is just about possible but you should only be able to manage “short-ish” sentences before need to take a breath.  

Beginners may initially find that a one or two mile tempo run is tough but a conditioned runner may be able to maintain tempo pace for a good eight miles and beyond.  Tempo session are excellent at increasing your tolerance to fatigue and should feature at least once a week in your training schedule.

Fartlek (RPE 6-8 or 85-90+% HRmax)

Fartlek is brilliant training but often underused by marathon runners.  It is based on a steady paced run but interspersed with periods of faster running at random times of your choice.  Vary the distance/time of the fast paced sections of these sessions to mix up the training stimulus and keep you interested.  Suggested times for fast sections can vary from 30 secs at RPE 8-9 to 5 mins at RPE 6-8.

Intervals (RPE 7-9 or 85+% HRmax)

Intervals are very similar to fartlek training. The key difference between them is that they are far more structured.  Interval sessions are excellent at increasing your threshold, thereby teaching the body to tolerate running at faster speeds.

E.g.

Distance/Time No. of intervals Rest between RPE % Max HR
1 mile 3-5 5-3 mins 6-8 80-90
5 minutes 4-8 1 min 6-7 80-90
800 meters 6-8 3-2 mins 7-8 85-95

As fitness improves – increase intervals, reduce rest time.  RPE will increase towards end of session.

By incorporating all of these training runs into your weekly regime you should be fully prepared for the Run Reigate Half-Marathon or 10K on Sunday 18th September.  To view the full SiS guide, please see http://www.scienceinsport.com/marathon-training-guide.

Good luck with your training!

 

Glass of milk

Give Your Recovery a Natural Boost


There are times when we all need some kind of recovery drink.  Whether it be a strong cup of tea after a tough morning meeting or, a drink (or two) in the pub with your mates after a testing week at work.  However, as essential as these beverages may be, these are not the kind of recovery drinks I’m talking about.  Sports drinks after a long run play an important role in restoring fluids and electrolytes lost through sweat, replacing muscle fuel and providing protein to help repair damaged muscles. That said, they don’t agree with everyone and are not the only options to aid your recovery.  Here’s a few natural options that you may want to incorporate.

For shorter runs, iced green tea can work wonders.  It has catechins (I promise I’ve not made this word up), a type of flavonoid and antioxidant that, as well as fighting disease, can also reduce muscle damage and speed recovery.  The key is in the steeping – the longer, the better.  If you drink 5 cups a day it becomes like a liquid superpower, but I’m not sure many of our bladders could contain that.

If you’re planning to run for 60 minutes, coconut water might be just what you need.  It provides a similar level of re-hydration as a sports drink, except it’s up to 10 times higher in potassium, an electrolyte that plays an important role in regulating blood pressure and muscle contractions (also found in bananas).  The best kind of water is straight from the nut, with a straw and umbrella.  This may pose a problem for those of you who don’t yet have coconut trees in garden, so perhaps best to stock up the next time you are holidaying along the Equator.  If not, the shops have some pretty good varieties.

Tart cherry juice drunk either before, the day of, or a couple of days after a really tough run, has been shown in studies to reduce inflammation, oxidative stress and muscle damage.  Cherries have the highest antioxidant level of any fruit and are a good source of melatonin – happy days!  

Another favourite is vegetable juice, with some combinations containing 3-5 times the amount of sodium and 10 times the potassium of a sports drink.  If it includes tomato, but not vodka (I’m not sure if there have been any studies on the recovery benefits of a Bloody Mary), you’re on to a winner.  Tomatoes contain lycopene, an antioxidant that protects muscles from oxidative stress.  Other helpful veggies include beetroot, spinach and carrots.  Beware of the side effects of beets though – many an unsuspecting person has almost called for an ambulance after a trip to the toilet.  Just like these people: 

911 Beets

Last but not least is … milk.  Our lovely friends at the British Red Cross told us this last year.  The best drink you can have after a half-marathon is a drink of the pearly white stuff.  Studies have shown that milk is better than both water and sports drinks at restoring fluid levels after running in extreme heat – a common problem in Reigate.  If drunk regularly it also increases the time it takes to reach exhaustion during subsequent exercise sessions.  Couple that with the vitamin D and calcium it provides and you can see why it comes highly recommended.  Yes, this includes chocolate milk too.  What better way to treat the kids after their Run Reigate Kids Race miles!

As I said at the beginning, there are many benefits to sports drinks and it’s definitely worth incorporating these into your running regime.  These alternative recovery drinks are purely suggested as a means of complementing them, plus now you’ll get to use that new juicer you got for Christmas too.

 

Simply Sports Socks

Simply Sports – Planning your run, wholesale.


With every running event you get a build up in excitement and the nearer the day of the run the more the nerves are jangling and the greater need to address those last minute details. Do I need new socks, have I got enough Gels, checking what time must I leave for the tenth time! It’s what we all go through as runners every time. It is the same for us at Simply Sports, with every event we get to enjoy our customer’s feelings and it is a great buzz for all the staff.

However, our preparations start over 9 months earlier when we plan and place orders for the following season. Yes it is that far ahead, 2016 is done and dusted and we are now working on 2017!

Even something as simple as socks are ordered well in advance and might involve a meeting in Munich at the Sports Trade fair, trips to London and Birmingham to see various suppliers, we go through the same process of choosing our socks except that the numbers are slightly bigger and we have to travel a bit further. Oh and once we sign on the dotted line there is no changing our mind, we are committed so have to get it right.

As race day nears, whether it is a local Parkrun or the London Marathon we make sure we monitor on a daily basis our stock of the essentials and with the Run Reigate Half marathon and 10K we have even more focus with the race packs. For Run Reigate the excitement is fantastic, we feel every nerve, every twinge that our customers tell us about and the wonderful community spirit that this event creates, our staff love it and always ask months ahead if they can work during the lead up and on the day of the event.

Afterwards, we take stock, are we happy with our performance, did we enjoy it as much as last year and most importantly how did our customers get on. For weeks afterwards we hear tales of the day, the tough bits the atmosphere and then it is on to the next event.  There is nothing like a great local event and Run Reigate is one of the best in the country, officially one of the best!

Then the phone rings and it is Alex Wilson of Hilly Socks asking to book an appointment to go through our sock requirements for 2017! Now where did I leave that crystal ball?


Adrian Pointer – Simply Sports, Reigate

 

Run Reigate Race Start

Your Turn? Advice for entering your first race


After watching Sunday’s London Marathon, did you force your way into your cupboard, past the ironing board, pull your trainers out from under the bike pump and picnic blanket, remove the dead spider, brush away the dust and say to yourself “I’m going to run a marathon next year”.  Watching the London Marathon is so motivational, either as part of the crowds lining the streets, or on the TV, and every year thousands of viewers will be inspired to run the magical route.  Don’t let it just be a dream, if all those ‘normal looking folks’ can do it, so can you.  Here’s some advice to get you started…

IMAG0829

Trainer Time

First of all, those trainers that you dusted off which were popular in the 90s, have probably had their day and you should get yourself a new pair.  There are all manner of highly technical running shoes out there now, which not only look good, but also do useful things such as flexibility in the right places, superior cushioning, traction, gait support and breathability.  It’s well worth a trip to a running shoe specialist, such as Reigate’s Simply Sports, who can provide expert advice on the right trainer for you.

Join the Club

For many people, one of joys of running is the quiet ‘me’ time.  However If you’re serious about running a long distance, but nervous about embarking on this kind of journey on your own, it’s worthwhile finding someone to train with, or better yet, joining a running club.  As well as the coaching, you will find seasoned runners to give you advice on technique and lengthening your runs.  Even if you enjoy the solitude of running, being part of a group once a week, can help with your speed, endurance and motivation on those tough days.  Unlike some of your friends, these people will not drift into a light sleep as you chat about your new glow in the dark kit, or a blow by blow account of your favourite routes.  They love it as much as you do!

Plan of Attack

Whether you’re training for your first 5K or a marathon, you should always have a strategy. It is strangely satisfying, marking off each training run from your plan on the fridge door – even if you’ve actually missed it, but feel that it’s wrong to leave it untouched!  A plan gives you focus, makes sure you train enough, but not too much – and helps you build up the miles at an appropriate speed so that you don’t over do it too early and end up with a jammy ankle.  Runner’s World is a fantastic source for plans, as well as just about any other running question that you might have.

Power Up

As well as a running programme, it’s worthwhile scheduling in some other strength/cross training.  It helps prevent injuries, improve general fitness, recovery and it can be fun to exercise in a different way at times when you’re struggling with your running mojo.  This can come in the form of a fitness class (like British Military Fitness), gym sessions, swimming, cycling, spinning,  etc.  It’s important to look after your core strength, and running alone won’t do that.  Yoga, Pilates or some other form of stretching is also equally important and can really help with the restoration of those tired legs.

Race, Race and Race Again

Running a marathon is a pretty daunting prospect on its own.  However if you start planning in some races over the coming months, you can stop it from seeming such a mammoth goal.  If you’re new to longer distances start with a 10K and move up to half-marathon distances a few months after that.  Reigate Priory Athletic Club have a 10K race in July, which you could then follow with Run Reigate’s Half Marathon on the 18th September.  Regular Saturday Park Runs can help you to monitor your speed progress too.  Runner’s World has a comprehensive race list for the year, from 5K to Ultra (should you be so inspired).

Giving Back

Finally, the odds of getting a ballot place for the London Marathon are slim: but don’t despair.  There are hundreds of places with charities looking for first time runners, as long as you can achieve the sponsorship goal which is usually around the £2,000+ mark.  Charity runners for the Virgin London Marathon have raised over £300 million to date, which is phenomenal.  Apart from supporting a fantastic cause, other benefits of running for a charity include the support they offer, running advice, cheer points, being part of a team, a post-race party with a free sports massage and of course, not to forget the all important t-shirt.  Why not start raising money for one of our charities when you sign up to compete in either our 10K or Half Marathon.

If however, in the coming weeks you decide against running a marathon, it’s still worth entering Run Reigate as we have 2 great challenging distances, a kids race and a fantastic community atmosphere in Priory Park for all the family to enjoy.  Plus you’ll have some lovely new trainers…

 

 

BMF Marathon team

The Run Reigate Guide to Surviving the London Marathon!


You’ve trained for months, you’ve planned your route, worn in your new trainers, picked out your most comfortable kit and finally the big race day is here.  Many of our wonderful Run Reigate runners will join with 36,000 others next Sunday, to take part in one of the world’s biggest and most famous distance races, the London Marathon.   Our local British Military Fitness crew have entered a massive team, running to raise money for The Children’s Trust, one of our own charities and we wish them all the best of luck.

Screen Shot 2016-04-18 at 12.28.33

For any first time marathon runner, it can be daunting, and we’re not talking covering the 26.2 miles.  It’s more than just physical endurance: the marathon is a logistical, biological and psychological obstacle course. For those of you getting ready to race, the Run Reigate team have come up with a few alternative tips to help you on your way…

Get greased up

Lather yourself in vaseline before you start (including your feet), even in places that are unlikely to chafe – trust us it really helps! Turn yourself into a big slippery sea-lion.  Added benefits include sliding your way to the front of your pen.  If you suffer from hayfever, rub a big dollop on your nose as prevents the pollen from getting in.  

Go before you go

There are loads of portaloos.  Hundreds in fact, but they will still have a long queue in the hour before the race.  It is OK to stand in line, get to the front, do your business, then return to the end of the queue and repeat … 3 times.  You’ll be thankful for this cleanse when you see everyone veering off to the side as soon as they’ve crossed the start line to wee in public.  

On your marks, get ready … hang around a bit!

And you’re off … or not as the case will probably be.  Unless you are an elite runner, the start can be a bit of an anti-climax as you often have to wait 5-10 minutes to get across the start line and the pace can be a little slow.  Distract yourself by loudly humming “Eye of the Tiger”.

Resist the Rhino

There will be an urge to sprint past everyone in fancy dress.  Their attire can be deceptive.  The guy dressed as a giant penguin is actually an Olympic Triathlete and he’ll mess with your head by speeding up as you attempt to overtake him.  It may be a blow to your confidence to find a foam fire hydrant ahead of you at mile 18, but it makes for a good anecdote later.  Much later.

People power-ups

The closest many of us will ever come to feeling like we’re in the Olympics, is crossing Tower Bridge.  The volume builds as you run down Tooley Street, with an explosion of noise as you turn on to the bridge, people clapping, banging tubes and shouting your name.  If you have an unusual name, they might shout something else, but don’t heckle them.  It’s OK to wave at people and high five the kids.  Spectators – bring hand sanitiser.

Mind your step

Everyone who has run a marathon will tell you to watch out for the drinks bottles on the ground.  But seriously, do, and it starts early.  One of our team slipped on a discarded bottle at mile 16 of the New York Marathon, horribly tearing her hamstring.  Being the tough nut she is, she walked the remainder in agony, doggedly determined to earn that bloomin’ medal!  The gel packets are just as bad and slimey.  They sometimes stick to your trainer, forcing you to remove it whilst hopping ungainly, racers behind accidentally grabbing you in a hug as they crash into you.  

Where’s Wally?

It’s definitely worthwhile knowing where your supporters are going to be so that you can pick them out, quite literally, in a crowd.  Banners, signs, fancy hats, unusual cheers or just really really loud voices are useful.  Especially in the final stretch, when you’ve forgotten your own name.

Salty beards

Some marathon runners sport an attractive salt beard when they finish the race, which always looks good in the photos and can be a surprise to their partners.  Shows you’ve really worked hard!  Replace the electrolytes through gels and energy drinks during the race, and fish and chips afterwards.

You’ve made it!

Once you’ve crossed the line it really is straightforward.  Be gently pushed by the race marshals  towards your photo and bag and start crying with joy.  Have cosy clothes to put on even if it’s not cold, as you will be soon.  Have snacks in your bag too, not just with your family or friends as they might have eaten them.  Really, there should be a big conveyor belt at the end just like the airport, where you are collected by someone, preferably with a wheelchair and a bottle of prosecco in the arm rest cup holder.

Think Dalek

Avoid steps, at all costs.  If you must use them in the days pending the race, try sliding down like a toddler, as long as you have something or someone to pull you up at the end.  Ice baths are also recommended, but may result in weird noises coming from your mouth without your control.

Enjoy it!  

You’ve earned it.  Yes, it will be one of the hardest things you’ve ever done, but also one of the best.  The atmosphere and crowds are amazing and there is such a variety of people running that you’ll be continually inspired.   You might even be on the TV, so remember to smile, practise your crowd wave and of course, wear your Run Reigate finishers t-shirt for all to see.

Run Reigate Flags

“I am the Master of my Fate, I am the Captain of my Soul”


What does it take to become a ‘Marathon Man’?  And no, I don’t mean Dustin Hoffman enduring some rogue dentistry.  Just as some of us mere mortals work up to running our first 10K, half or full marathon, Rob Young and Eddie Izzard have completed amazing mental and physical feats that take endurance running to a new elevation, earning themselves the title of Marathon Man.

Extreme races are springing up all over the world, as some runners look for the next level of fortitude.  The legendary Marathon Des Sables started on Friday, in its 28th year and is according to many “The Toughest Race on Earth”.  It’s an ultra, run over 6 days on a course of around 150 miles, in nearly 50C degree heat. The website claims, “Any idiot can run an Ultra marathon, but it takes a special kind of idiot to run the Marathon Des Sables”.  The athletes who run these distances are able to tap into an inner tenacity, that many of us don’t feel we have.

Rob Young had that inner belief.  He also had a very unusual start.  After watching the London Marathon in 2014, his girlfriend bet him 20p that he couldn’t run 26.2 miles.  With an offer like that, what Scot could say no (as a fellow Scot, I am allowed to make that joke).  So Rob got up early the next morning and ran a marathon before work.  He didn’t stop there though – Rob then ran marathons or ultras consecutively for 420 days, covering the same distance as 476 marathons and 11,700 miles in one year.  He won 96 of the races and set some world records on the way.  In January 2015, he set off on a 3,100 mile race across America from LA to Washington DC, which he won by 30 hours, even though in the middle of it he flew back to compete in the London Marathon, an homage to the start of his personal journey.    

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Although Rob had been an athlete when he was young, competing for GB as a triathlete in the 20-24 age group, he hadn’t been running regularly before commencing this amazing feat.  Rob has carried on competing in marathons and ultras.  Studies have shown that his ability to run marathon day after day is extraordinary and that his pain threshold must be very high.  However, athleticism and the ability to tolerate pain do not necessarily make an extreme athlete and he has created purpose from his running that drives him on.  He has raised thousands of pounds for worthy charities that support kids.  He’s a man who clearly believes you are master of your own destiny, deciding to push himself to unparalleled goals and smashing them.    

‘Marathon Men’ don’t have to be athletes.  Eddie Izzard is a hero in our house, ever since my brother introduced me to the ‘Definite Article’ when I was a student.  I know he’s a man of mind over matter.  He has chosen to perform his shows in French, German, Spanish, Russian and Arabic, languages he didn’t even speak, just to challenge himself.  He took this fabulous mindset to endurance running, when in the UK in 2009 and with only 5 weeks training he ran 43 marathons in 51 days, covering 1,100 miles for Sports Relief.  After a foiled attempt in 2012, due to serious medical issues, to run 27 marathons in 27 days in honour of Nelson Mandela’s imprisonment on Robben Island, Eddie came back in 2016 to complete the challenge.  For many people, the weight of such a massive previous disappointment might pull them down, but determinedly he forced his way through, promising to himself and the millions of viewers following him that he would run, walk or crawl his way through the blazing 30C degree heat to complete the challenge and help raise over £2 million for Sports Relief.  In his BBC3 documentary, he reads William Ernest Henley’s ‘Invictus’, a poem that inspired the resilience of Nelson Mandela and clearly at times a mantra for Eddie has he fought his way along mile after mile.  Not a natural athlete, but a man whose mental strength allows him to achieve amazing physical feats.  His great recovery tips of how you can have a beer after a marathon as it has carbohydrates and water in it, show he is a man after my own heart.  Yes, I do love him!

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Being a ‘Marathon Man’ is not about gender.  Let us not forget some of the amazing women who have also been an inspiration to us and no, I’m not talking about myself here.  Apparently women in general are 3 x more likely to complete an ultra than men, not because of fitness, but rather because they are less likely to give up.  Ellie Greenwood is a two-time 100K World Champion and holds course records for a variety of ultra races.   She was the first Britain to win South Africa’s 90 km Comrades Marathon (the oldest ultra-marathon in the world)  in 2014, with a time of 6 hours and 18 minutes.  That’s averaging at 14.3 km per hour in sweltering heat.  We also of course have the wonderful Paula Radcliffe, a marathon legend who retired last year, still holding the women’s world marathon record which she made after just a year of marathon running.  She holds 9 other world records and has asthma!  These ladies have given their all.

When I trained for my first marathon a few years ago, I was dreading my big training runs.  The day I ran 20 miles, it was blowing a gale, snowing with sub-zero conditions.  I had to stop various times (which was the first time that had happened in a training run) and came home with a frozen mono-brow and zero belief that I could run 26.2 miles.  Then the weather turned and I galloped round my next long training run, feeling invincible (clearly this was only in my head and I have no doubt that I was actually shuffling along, being overtaken by sprightly pensioners).  Finishing the race a few weeks later, was without a doubt one of the greatest experiences of my life.  I’m not really a runner, but I had said I was going to do it, people had sponsored me, I was being tracked, pac-man style round the route and I didn’t want to let myself down – so I did it!  I am the Master of my Fate, I am the Captain of my Soul…

These Marathon Men are amazing and so are you.  The first step on any journey is deciding you’re going to do it.  So go on, sign up at www.runreigate.com and we’ll be there to cheer you on every step of the way.

 

Invictus, William Ernest Henley

Out of the night that covers me

Black as the pit from pole to pole,

I thank whatever gods may be

For my unconquerable soul.

 

In the fell clutch of circumstance

I have not winced nor cried aloud.

Under the bludgeonings of chance

My head is bloody, but unbowed.

 

Beyond this place of wrath and tears

Looms but the Horror of the shade,

And yet the menace of the years

Finds and shall find me unafraid.

 

It matters not how strait the gate,

How charged with punishments the scroll,

I am the master of my fate,

I am the captain of my soul.

Kids

Calling All Superheroes – Run Reigate Kids Race


If you are a parent, many of you will have had your kids waiting for you at the finish line of a big race, wildly cheering you on, proudly telling you they will run a half-marathon one day, whilst manhandling your precious sweaty medal to put on their own little neck?  Well, the Run Reigate team believe that budding running dreams could happen sooner rather than later …

We have been toying with the idea of a kids race since our inaugural year, but wanted to do something different that would capture the imagination of the next generation of runners.  An event that all kids, from reception to teenagers, can proudly take part in.  From there, the idea of a kids half-marathon was born: but not just any half-marathon.  Partnering with Reigate & Banstead Council, the Run Reigate Kids Race is part of the R&BeActive initiative to combat childhood obesity, and is sponsored by global camera and printer giant Canon.

We’re challenging kids to accumulate 12 miles by running regularly through their schools in the months leading up to September. Then, on Run Reigate race day (Sunday 18th) they complete the challenge by taking part in the exciting grand finale –  a 1.1 mile race in Priory Park to achieve the 13.1 miles – their very first half-marathon!    

With the help of our digital partners Jellyfish, we have built a dedicated safe website to track all of the amazing miles they run in the build-up to Race Day, along with some suggested mile long training routes around the local area.  If you’re also training for either our 10K or the half-marathon, maybe they can join you for part of one of your weekly sessions, or whilst you’re on holiday, making training a real family affair.  All local schools will be participating in the challenge, so kids can be part of their bigger school team, running with their teachers, inspiring their classmates and in turn being motivated by others.  Apart from the high quality bling, there will also be prizes for the winners in each age category.

If this is all sounds tempting, you might have some questions:

What do I need to do?  

You can register your kids at www.runreigate.com

Is there an age limit?  

Any school child can take place, from age 4 in Reception to age 15 in Year 11!  15 year olds have the option of either running the kids’ half-marathon or in the main 10K event.

Do they have to do the 12 miles in advance?  

Only if they want to.  If they prefer, they can simply join in and run for fun on Race Day

Is my school involved?  

Yes, every school in Reigate & Banstead has been invited to participate, so you should hear about it soon from them.

What time is it?  

There will be 5 kids races split into class year groups:

  • 12.00 – Years 11, 10 & 9
  • 12.10 – Years 8 & 7
  • 12.20 – Years 6, 5 & 4
  • 12.35 – Years 3 & 2
  • 12.50 – Year 1 & Reception.

How many places are there?  

As this event will be popular, we are limiting the 2016 race to 2,000 places in total.

How much does it cost?  

£12, which covers the cost of running the event, a technical race t-shirt and an amazing medal – the same one as the adult half-marathon and 10K runners will receive!  It’ll stop them from nabbing yours.

Can they run for charity?  

Yes!  We will provide entrants with a sponsorship form where they can raise money (e.g. £1 per mile) and run for a charity of their choosing or one of ours.

What else will there be for kids to do?  

There will be a host of FREE fun activities for kids of all ages in the Move Revolution Kids Active Zone (last year we hosted over 1,500 kids who didn’t want to leave!).  There will also be live music, ice-cream, gourmet burgers, fresh pizza and smoothies in the Food Festival.

What about parking?  

We’ll have hundreds of parking spaces within a 5 minute walk of Priory Park.

Loos?  

Don’t worry….there are loads (and loads) of loos in the park.

Run Reigate has become a fantastic community focused event in Priory Park with an amazing atmosphere and a great day out for the whole family!   The addition of the Kids Race will make it even bigger and better and we’d love to have you and your children there, helping us make history as the UK’s first kids half-marathon.  

If you would like to enter the Kids Race, 10K or Half-Marathon, please register at www.runreigate.com.  Any questions, that are not covered online, please feel free to get in touch at karen.hanmore@runreigate.co.uk

Genieve Poultney

5 achievable Half Marathon running tips from a non-pro


I am not a professional runner. Sure, I go to the gym and do a bit of military fitness every now and then, but I did the Half Marathon for the first time last year in 2:05 and beat my time this year by 15 minutes!

As a result, I wanted to share some of the things that keep me striving as a ‘normal’ person that runs.

Don’t expect any science or Olympian insights – just potential considerations for Runing Reigate in 2016:

Getting over the hump

Like with a 10k, or any long run, the first twenty minutes is the hardest. After that you should have found a pace you can settle into. That’s when I get the most joy out of running and it becomes a pleasure rather than a chore. Don’t give up before it gets good!

Helpful habits

Routine really helps my training. I like to stick to the days and times I run, for example. But essentially anything you can do to take the ‘thinking’ out of training and be psychologically prepared.

I drink water but also got into a habit of having a cup of coffee before a long run (if I was happy I was hydrated enough). It may not be the most advisable option but I felt like it gave me a smidgen more energy! It may even be a placebo! But this was just another thing that gets me feeling ready in body and mind.

Pace vs. duration

I don’t think it’s a coincidence that I run at a slower pace on longer runs, there’s a natural correlation, and in turn it helps to balance out my heart rate BPM (beats per minute).

If my heart rate increased by more than ten BPM during training I would be inclined to slow down in order to ensure I was training within a healthy parameter.

It’s all common sense, but using a Fitbit or other running tracker (like the Strava app) makes you a health-aware runner who can look after yourself in good time, if the data shows you may need to.

Mix up your route

What will the route terrain be like on the day? You can’t predict the weather but you can get a feel for the land by trialling the course!

The route changed this year and there was a much steeper hill at the end (bosh hill). I would highly recommend running the course beforehand if you’ve not already to get a sense of the challenge ahead.

If it’s too far just take a more varied route once in a while so you know you can handle a change in terrain.

Comfort kit all the way!

I bought some adidas ultra-boost running shoes at this years’ Run Reigate post-race.

I wish I’d had them beforehand now, they are a dream. I’d liken it to feeling like you are running on marshmallows! They feel like they are really good for your knees too and the overall ergonomics of running.

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My Half Marathon Running Diary 2015

For each run I had a goal in mind, something to aim towards, as a result I often exceeded it!

(On August 21st I was running with a friend – so this was more of a social than anything! Luckily she is a fitty and was happy with the pace I set.)

Date Kilometres Miles Pace Time Heart BPM
17th August 19.59 12.17 5”49 1:54:12 153
19th August 13.71 8.52 5”39 1:17:35 158
21st August 7.09 4.41 6”03 42:59 156
9th September 19.13 11.88 5”26 1:44:05 161

 

I still went to the gym and did military fitness in between runs, if I hadn’t I would have run more.

Mixing it up used different muscle groups though and made me feel stronger for when I did run.

So that’s it, from one non-pro runner to another. Maybe I’ll see you there next year!

Genevieve Poultney

(Part of the Jellyfish running team)

Jellyfish Running Team

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you have any unusual running habits? We’d love to know…

 

KSS LOGO 25 YEARS SUPPORTING_RCN

Air Ambulance needs you to Run Reigate


Kent, Surrey & Sussex Air Ambulance are celebrating their Silver Jubilee during 2015 and are hoping that you will choose to Run Reigate and raise money to help them continue to save lives into the next quarter century and beyond.

An independent charitable healthcare provider working with the Ambulance Service (not part of the NHS), they are funded almost entirely by voluntary donations.

The service has grown from one helicopter serving Kent only, to two aircraft serving those in need of emergency medical help across Surrey and East & West Sussex, as well as Kent, 24 hours a day.

The team consists of at least one pilot and a minimum of one Specialist Doctor and one Critical Care Paramedic. Once they are at the scene, they provide all the expertise and equipment that you would normally find in an A&E department. Such rapid assessment and treatment is vital in the cases that the crew attends, and goes a long way to enabling positive outcomes in the most traumatic of incidents.

The charity are offering free places to those who can pledge to raise sponsorship of £50 (for the 10K) or £140 (half marathon). Or, if you have your own place, you can still help the Air Ambulance by raising as much as you are able.

All those choosing to raise funds for Kent, Surrey & Sussex Air Ambulance through Run Reigate, will receive a charity running vest, promotional materials and a limited edition 25th Anniversary pin badge.

To find out more, click here or email Lauren Elphick laurene@kssairambulance.org.uk or call a member of the Community Team on 01622 833833.